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2019 September Semester
Aug 24, 2019
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ANTH 102 - Anthropology: A World of Discovery
Using a thematic approach, this course explores what defines the human species. Some of the themes explored may include human evolution and our primate biological kin; archaeology and digging for the past; culture in a global world; communication or the essentials of being a talking and increasingly texting primate; health as social and biological; production and consumption, from the first stone tools to the Big Mac; and other topics that deal with humanity past and contemporary.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 200 - Biological Anthropology
A survey of the origins and evolution of human population diversity. Topics covered include an introduction to evolutionary and population genetic theory; trends and debates in human evolution; principles of human growth, development and aging; and polymorphism, polytypism and biocultural adaptation in human populations.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 201 - Medical Anthropology
Understandings of wellness in various cultural systems studied through the classification of health and illness categories, and the range of approaches to maintaining and intervening in health processes. Examples relevant to Northern peoples and issues will be developed.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 203 - Archaeology of the Americas
A survey of the archaeological record of prehistoric human occupation of North, Central and South America. Issues such as peopling of the New World, paleo-Indian adaptations, origins of agriculture, the expansion and contraction of interaction spheres, and the consequences of contact will be considered from a regional and continental perspective.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 205 - Introduction to Archaeology
An introduction to archaeological methods. This course will trace the developmental history of the discipline, and will focus on current methods and techniques used in archaeology. Using case studies from around the globe, the course will highlight the holistic and interdisciplinary nature of archaeology.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 206 - Ethnography In Northern British Columbia
A survey of the ethnographic literature for this region, and an introduction to the methodology and paradigms of ethnographic research.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 207 - Popular Culture
The study of contemporary cultural phenomena with anthropological methods.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 209 - Pacific Ethnography
A survey of the enthnographic literature of the Pacific with a focus on selected cultures and/or regions. The course will discuss the methodology and paradigms of the area's ethnographic research.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 211 - Anthropology Through Film
This course will introduce the student to the subject matter and theories of social and cultural anthropology through the extensive use of anthropological and documentary film. Topics will cover a spectrum of issues, including: marriage and the family; economics; ritual and religion; conflict and conflict resolution; and culture change, among others.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 212 - Archaeology of the Old World
This survey course focuses on human antiquity outside of the Americas. Temporally the course covers some two and a half million years of prehistory, beginning with the earliest known arachaeological evidence in Africa, and ending with the great civilizations of Asia, Europe and Africa.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 213 - Peoples and Cultures
This course examines the diversity of human cultures and languages through the comparison of contemporary societies, and patterns of social organization.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 214 - Anthropology of Europe
A survey of anthropological literature of Europe, with a focus on selected cultures or religions. The course will discuss the methodology and paradigms of the area's ethnographic research.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Field Camp, World Wide Web

ANTH 215 - Anthropology of Canada
A survey of anthropological literature describing Canada, with a focus on selected cultures or regions. Examples relevant to northern peoples and issues will be used. The course will discuss the methodology and paradigms of the area's ethnographic research. This course will allow students to make inferences to analyze what is happening in their own community.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 217 - Language and Culture
This course provides an overview of the ways linguistic anthropology analyzes languages and communication. Topics may include: ethnolinguistics and ethnoscience; discourse analysis; and language use and language planning in the modern nation-state.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

ANTH 220 - Introduction to Primatology
A survey of major issues in contemporary primatology, including origins and evolution, taxonomy, socioecology, mating systems, dominance, co-operative and coercive structures, intelligence and conservation.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 230 - Introduction to Forensic Anthropology
This course examines the contribution of anthropology to the recovery, identification and interpretation of recent human skeletal remains. Topics covered include forensic archaeology, methods of biological and personal identification, trauma and taphonomy, crime scene analysis, the anthropologist as expert witness, war crimes and mass graves.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 240 - The Neandertals
This course examines conceptions and misconceptions of the most enigmatic of our ancestors, the Neandertals. Since first discovered in 1848 Neandertals have occupied a special place in the story of human evolution - they have been pathologized, idealized, and romanticized. Neandertals have generated more controversy surrounding human evolution than any other ancestor. This course examines aspects of biology, culture, symbolic behaviour, and subsistence, considering Neandertal origins and ‘disappearance,’ as well as considering how Neandertals have been represented in ‘popular culture’ over the past 150 years.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

ANTH 250 - The Ancient Egyptians
This course is a survey of the development and workings of ancient Egyptian state society. The course begins with the pre-Dynastic Period and ends with the Ptolemaic Period, but the major focus is on the Dynastic Period. Using a combination of archaeological and documentary evidence, the course examines ancient Egyptian history, politics, technology, cosmology, and other aspects of everyday life.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 298 - Topics in Anthropology
This course covers particular aspects of anthropology selected by the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit (maximum 6 credit hours) with the permission of the Department Chair (permission given only when subject matter differs substantially).
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Field Camp

ANTH 300 - Methods in Social Anthropology
Research design, data collection, statistics and analysis as used in anthropology. The seminar will discuss field methods and use of archival materials.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 301 - Archaeological Lab Methods
This course introduces students to laboratory methods used in archaeological analyses. Topics will include chipped and ground stone tools, fauna, bone tools, basketry, quantitative methods and more. Students will conduct research projects, and may have the opportunity to analyze artifacts from archaeological sites in B.C. and elsewhere.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ANTH 303 - Archives, Texts, Museums, and Contemporary Communities
Students will engage in projects in which they combine the use of archival, textual, museum and interview methodologies.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

ANTH 304 - Kinship and Social Organization
A review of the literature on kinship and social organization, and an examination of selected cases from various societies.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 305 - Circumpolar Ethnography
A survey of the archaeological and ethnographic literature on the north, with a focus on selected cultures from Alaska, Northern Canada, Greenland, Northern Scandinavia and Northern Russia. The course will discuss the methodology and paradigms of the area's ethnographic research.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Field Camp, World Wide Web

ANTH 310 - Applied Anthropology
Theory in practice as it is understood by those who practice and advocate what many consider to be an entire subfield in anthropology: Applied Anthropology. The course will focus on the practice of anthropology using examples relevant to the northern world, and will consider issues associated with doing anthropology in difficult situations.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

ANTH 311 - Nutritional Anthropology
This course undertakes a biocultural examination of the relationship between food (e.g., acquisition and avoidance; distribution; preparation), human health, and society in past and present populations. Lab exercises examine aspects of research methodology, including anthropometrics, dietics and energetics. This course is cross-listed with HHSC 311-3.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ANTH 312 - Human Adaptability
This course will examine the genetic, epigenetic, and behavioural/cultural avenues used by humankind in adapting to environmental stresses associated with extreme habitats, (e.g., cold, heat, hypoxia). Human (mal)adaption to postindustrial revolution urban conditions (e.g., crowding, noise, pollution) will also be addressed.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ANTH 315 - Anthropological Theory
This course investigates the major theoretical trends in anthropology from the nineteenth century to the present. It introduces central issues in anthropology theory, key concepts in the discipline, important authors and debates over theoretical perspectives.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

ANTH 316 - The Social Theory and Structure of Contemporary Canadian Society
The Social Theory and Structure of Contemporary Canadian Society. A consideration of basic themes, theories and concepts in advanced social thought as they relate to modern Canadian industrial society. Theories to be reviewed will include: functionalism, conflict theory, exchange theory and interactionist theory. These will be reviewed in relation to key issues impacting modern Canadian industrial societies, including: social inequality, ethnic and gender relations, the family, political and economic organization, work and occupations, community and region, the environment and utilization of natural resources, and social movements and social change.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 320 - Biology of Circumpolar Peoples
A lecture/seminar course exploring biological variability in contemporary circumpolar peoples, notable growth and development, morphology (size, shape and body composition) and physiology, within a framework of evolutionary ecology. Also addressed will be effects of culture change on, e.g. work capacity, nutritional adaptation, demography, and morbidity.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 325 - Archaeological Theory
Over the last three decades, there has been a tremendous explosion of literature concerning theory in archaeology. In this seminar course, students will learn about the historical contexts and development of the various theoretical schools that have contributed to our current state of knowledge. Weekly readings and seminar discussion will be mandatory.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Final Exam, Audio/Video, Seminar, World Wide Web

ANTH 335 - Archaeological Heritage Management
In this lab-seminar course weekly readings focus on topics relevant to archaeological heritage management, also known as Cultural Resource Management (CRM). Discussions will center on issues such as: heritage legislation in British Columbia and elsewhere, First Nations and private sector concerns, and archaeological consulting. Labs will focus on methodological issues such as survey techniques, culturally modified trees and more.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Final Exam, Laboratory

ANTH 380 - Topics in Archaeology
This is an occasional course offering to enable existing or visiting faculty to teach courses not normally offered in the program. Each course reflects the geographic and topical interests of the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit (maximum 6 credit hours) with permission of the Department Chair (permission to be given only when the subject matter differs substantially).
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

ANTH 400 - Advanced Anthropological Theory
This course surveys and critiques selected contemporary approaches to cultural and social theory.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 401 - Anthropological Perspectives on Inequality
An examination of the embedding of inequality in cultural systems, and the intersection of categories such as race, class and gender in systems of hegemony; examples will be selected from a variety of cultural contexts.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 404 - Comparative Study of Indigenous Peoples of the World
A project-based seminar in which students will examine the similarities and differences of selected groups, focusing on issues such as relations with state societies, etc.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

ANTH 405 - Landscapes, Place and Culture
This course provides an examination and critique of the anthropological approaches to landscape, space and place. Cross-cultural and cross-temporal case studies are used.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video

ANTH 406 - Feminist Perspectives in Anthropology
This course will survey and critique selected theoretical approaches and ethnographies to examine key areas of interest and debate in the field of feminist anthropology. This course will draw from the political ideology in feminism concerned with critical examination of gender relations and cross-cultural anthropological study.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 407 - British Columbia Ethnography
This course is a comparative critique of contemporary ethnographic research of selected cultures or regions.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

ANTH 409 - British Columbia Archaeology
This is a problem-based seminar in which selected issues are examined from several points of view.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 410 - Theory of Nation and State
A critical examination of theories of ethnicity, nationalism and statehood from an anthropological perspective.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 411 - Topics in Biological Anthropology
This course is a problem-oriented and project-based seminar in which one (or more) selected topics in biological anthropology are examined. This course may be repeated for credit (maximum 6 credit hours) with the permission of the Department Chair (permission to be given only when the subject matter differs substantially).
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Laboratory

ANTH 413 - Environmental Anthropology
This is an examination of the anthropological literature on ecology and environmental practices in which contempoary issues and examples relevant to indigenous practices and northern peoples are developed.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

ANTH 414 - Religion, Ideology, and Belief Systems
This course provides a review of anthropological approaches to religion, ideology and belief systems with comparative examples from several cultures.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

ANTH 415 - Economic Anthropology
This course is an introduction to the field of economic anthropology looking at social and cultural contexts for processes of production, distribution, and consumption. Contemporary issues such as development will be explored.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 416 - Archaeological Survey and Mapping
Course participants will learn about the archaeological survey, from both the academic perspective, and from the perspective of professional consulting archaeology. Students will become proficient at map reading, compassing, sampling strategies in forest and non-forest environments, and recognizing cultural features pertinent to the area. Participants will learn skills necessary for potential employment with professional archaeology firms. This will include observing protocols with First Nation communities and liaising with government and corporate entities. Where possible, students will have an opportunity to work for a few days with professional consultants.
Credits: 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Field Camp

ANTH 417 - Excavation and Field Interpretation in Archaeology
Excavation forms a central aspect of archaeology. As part of this course, students and community members will participate in a six to eight week excavation of an archaeological locality. This will involve initial set-up of the area, excavation and record-keeping, and basic field laboratory procedures. In addition to "hands-on" participation, daily seminar discussion will be mandatory; topics will center on each day's survey and excavation results. These sessions will be interdisciplinary, reflecting the interests of the instructors, community members, visiting researchers and students. Topics will invariably focus on geomorphology, lithic artifacts, zooarchaeology, paleoethnobotany, paleoecology, oral traditions and Traditional Use, and the social context of conducting archaeology. The field school will often take place in remote localities in British Columbia and elsewhere, and so students may have to live in a field camp situation. In addition to basic tuition, there may be additional fees to cover camp and transportation costs.
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Field Camp

ANTH 418 - Archaeology and First Nations
This course introduces students to the value of ethnographic information (including oral history, place names documentation, traditional technology, subsistence, and traditional use activities), the interpretation of archaeological data, and construction of First Nations (pre)history.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Field Camp

ANTH 419 - Political and Legal Anthropology
This course provides a comparative study of power, political organization; leadership; non-centralized and centralized political systems' social control; and cross-cultural study of law. Contemporary issues relevant to the north will be addressed, for example self-government and sovereignty.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 420 - Races, Racism, and Human Biology
This seminar course investigates the biological basis of human diversity and difference. It deals with the origin and mechanisms of human population variation, the nature of racial and racist studies in both historical and social context, and the question of race as a valid subject of scientific inquiry.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 421 - Ethnographic Field Methods
A project-based seminar in which students will actualize field methods in ethnographic research, in addition to closely examining questions of ethical research and community participation in ethnographic research. This course consists of at least three weeks of classroom instruction in a field location and will emphasize the actualization of conventional ethnographic methods and procedures in an actual field setting. Students will be expected to participate in a larger field project and to gain direct experience in field methods while being sensitized to the requirements of ethical research and community involvement in ethnography.
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Field Camp

ANTH 422 - Ethnographic Research Project
A project-based course in which students shall examine and compare selected aspects of cultures and peoples before integrating this acquired knowledge to design and carry out a major research project arising from the field experience. The ethnographic material covered shall be appropriate to the field school's locality and/or general research topic.
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Field Camp

ANTH 423 - Urban Anthropology
This course provides a review of the anthropological approaches to and the social theory of contemporary urban society in the local, national and global contexts of the modern world. Contemporary issues relevant to the North will be addressed.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 425 - Introduction to Zooarchaeology
This lab course introduces students to the study of animal bones found in arachaeological contexts. The first part of this course focuses on animal bone identification, while the second part centers on theoretical aspects of animal use by pre-Industrial human societies. As part of this course, students may have to prepare animal skeletons.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ANTH 430 - Stone Tools in Archaeology
Stone tools are the most ubiquitous type of artifact found around the world. This lab-seminar course focuses on methods and techniques for analyzing stone tools, and includes a strong theoretical component on stone tool production and use in pre-Industrial societies. Weekly labs will focus on analytical procedures, and in addition students are expected to complete assigned readings and participate in discussions.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ANTH 440 - Internship

Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Internship

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

ANTH 450 - Undergraduate Thesis in Anthropology

Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Undergrad Thesis

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

ANTH 451 - Traditional Use Studies
An advanced seminar on traditional use studies, their use, application, and development. The seminar will examine the origins and development of this field, review case studies recent applications, and contemporary policies.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Final Exam, Audio/Video, Seminar

ANTH 460 - Anthropology Capstone
This course engages students in the contemporary methodological and theoretical debates, and ideological challenges that face anthropologists today. Topics range from ethical considerations over the construction and ownership of knowledge to the practical challenges of how to set up a field/research project. This course prepares students to work within this ever-changing discipline through reinforcing the interlinked nature of sociocultural, biological and archaeological inquiry. Using an integrative approach, this course illustrates how our diverse theory, methods and practice may work together to challenge established rhetoric and create innovative ideas about the past, present and future.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 498 - Special Topics in Anthropology

Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Field Camp, Laboratory

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

ANTH 499 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

ANTH 500 - Method and Theory Seminar
An examination of current developments within the subdiscipline in which the student is taking the Honours Program. Developed in consultation with and supervised by a member of the Anthropology faculty, the aim is as much to explore where linkages do and do not exist across Anthropology's subdisciplines as it is to understand the state of the art of the chosen subdiscipline. The course will conclude with a seminar discussion developed and directed by the student, open to all Anthropology faculty and the students' peers.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed

ANTH 501 - Research Prospectus
In consultation with the supervisor, the student will design an original research project which will form the core of the Honours thesis. The design will be presented as a colloquium open to the university community.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed

ANTH 502 - Honours Thesis
In accordance with the program guidelines for thesis projects, the student will present the results of their project in a paper of 12,500 - 15,000 words, to be evaluated by the thesis supervisor and an outside reader. Successful completion of the Honours thesis course will be based on the quality of written work, as well as an oral defense open to the university community.
Credits: 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed

ANTH 600 - Advanced Anthropological Theory
This course surveys and critiques selected contemporary approaches to cultural and social theory.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 601 - Anthropological Perspectives on Inequality
An examination of the embedding of inequality in cultural systems, and the intersection of categories such as race, class and gender in systems of hegemony; examples will be selected from a variety of cultural contexts.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 604 - Comparative Study of Indigenous Peoples of the World
A project-based seminar in which students will examine the similarities and differences of selected groups, focusing on issues such as relations with state societies, etc.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 605 - Landscapes, Place and Culture
This course provides an examination and critique of the anthropological approaches to landscape, space and place. Cross-cultural and cross-temporal case studies are used.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 606 - Feminist Perspectives in Anthropology
This course surveys and critiques selected theoretical approaches and ethnographies to examine key areas of interest and debate in the field of feminist anthropology. This course draws from the political ideology in feminism concerned with critical examination of gender relations and cross-cultural anthropological study.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 607 - British Columbia Ethnography
This course is a comparative critique of contemporary ethnographic research of selected cultures or regions.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

ANTH 609 - Advanced British Columbia Archaeology
This is a problem-based seminar in which selected issues are examined from several points of view.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 610 - Theory of Nation and State
A critical examination of theories of ethnicity, nationalism and statehood from an anthropological perspective.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 611 - Biological Anthropology
This course is a problem-oriented and project-based seminar examining a selected topic, or topics, in biological anthropology. Credit is available for both ANTH 411- (3-6) and ANTH 611-3, provided the topic is substantially different between offerings.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 613 - Environmental Anthropology
This course is an examination of the anthropological literature on ecology and environmental practices in which contemporary issues and examples relevant to indigenous practices and northern peoples are developed.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate, Doctoral
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 614 - Religion, Ideology, and Belief Systems
This course provides a review of anthropological approaches to religion, ideology and belief systems using comparative examples from several cultures.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

ANTH 615 - Economic Anthropology
An introduction to the field of economic anthropology, looking at social and cultural contexts of production, distribution, and consumption. Contemporary issues such as development will be explored.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 616 - Archaeological Survey and Mapping
Course participants will learn about archaeological survey, from both the academic perspective, and from the perspective of professional consulting archaeology. Students will become proficient at map reading, compassing, sampling strategies in forest and non-forest environments, and recognizing cultural features pertinent to the area. Participants will learn skills necessary for potential employment with professional archaeology firms. This will include observing protocols with First Nation communities and liaising with government and corporate entities. Where possible, students will have an opportunity to work for a few days with professional consultants.
Credits: 6.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Audio/Video, Field Camp, World Wide Web

ANTH 617 - Excavation and Field Interpretation in Archaeology
Excavation forms a central aspect of archaeology. As part of this course, students and community members will participate in a 6-8 week excavation of an archaeological locality. This will involve initial set-up of the area, excavation and record-keeping, and basic field laboratory procedures. In addition to "hands-on" participation, daily seminar discussion will be mandatory; topics will center on each day's survey and excavation results. These sessions will be interdisciplinary, reflecting the interests of the instructors, community members, visiting researchers and students. Topics will invariably focus on geomorphology, lithic artifacts, zooarchaeology, paleoethnobotany, paleoecology, oral traditions and traditional use, and the social context of conduct in archaeology. The field school will often take place in remote localities in British Columbia and elsewhere, and so students may have to live in a field camp situation. In addition to basic tuition, there may be additional fees to cover camp and transportation costs.
Credits: 6.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Audio/Video, Field Camp, World Wide Web

ANTH 618 - Archaeology and First Nations
Introduces students to the value of ethnographic information (including oral history, place names documentation, traditional technology, subsistence, and traditional use activities), the interpretation of archaeological data and construction of First Nations (pre) history.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Audio/Video, Field Camp, World Wide Web

ANTH 619 - Political and Legal Anthropology
Comparative study of power, political organization; non-centralized and centralized political systems social control; and a cross-cultural study of law. Contemporary issues relevant to the north will be addressed, for example self government and sovereignty.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 620 - Races, Racism, and Human Biology
This seminar course investigates the biological basis of human diversity and difference. It deals with the origin and mechanisms of human population variation, the nature of racial and racist studies in both historical and social context, and the question of race as a valid subject of scientific inquiry.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ANTH 621 - Ethnographic Field Methods
This course is a project-based seminar in which students actualize field methods in ethnographic research, in addition to closely examining questions of ethical research and community participation in ethnographic research. This course consists of at least three weeks of classroom instruction in a field location and emphasizes the actualization of conventional ethnographic methods and procedures in a field setting. Students are expected to participate in a larger field project and to gain direct experience in field methods while being sensitized to the requirements of ethical research and community involvement in ethnography. Credit may be available for ANTH 421-(3-6) and ANTH 621-(3-6) if the subject matter and course location differ substaintially.
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Field Camp

ANTH 622 - Ethnographic Research Project
This is a project-based course in which students examine and compare selected aspects of cultures and peoples before integrating this acquired knowledge to design and carry out a major research project arising from the field experience. The ethnographic material covered shall be appropriate to the field school's locality and/or general research topic. Credit may be available for ANTH 422-(3-6) and ANTH 622-(3-6) if the subject matter and course location differ substantially.
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Field Camp, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Tutorial

ANTH 623 - Urban Anthropology
A review of the anthropological approaches to and the social theory of contemporary urban society in the local, national and global contexts of the modern world. Contemporary issues relevant to the North will be addressed.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

ANTH 625 - Introduction to Zooarchaeology
This lab course introduces students to the study of animal bones found in archaeological contexts. The first part of the course focuses on animal bone identification, while the second part centers on theoretical aspects of animal use by pre-Industrial human societies. As part of the course, students may have to prepare animal skeletons.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, World Wide Web

ANTH 630 - Stone Tools in Archaeology
Stone tools are the most ubiquitous type of artifact found around the world. This lab-seminar course focuses on methods and techniques for analyzing stone tools, and includes a strong theoretical component on stone tool production and use in pre-Industrial societies. Weekly labs focus on analytical procedures, and in addition students are expected to complete assigned readings and participate in discussions.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, World Wide Web

ANTH 651 - Traditional Use Studies
This course is an advanced seminar on traditional use studies, their use, application, and development. The seminar examines the origins and development of the field, reviews case studies and recent applications, and analyzes contemporary policies.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Seminar

ANTH 698 - Special Topics in Anthropology
Credit available for both ANTH 498-3 and ANTH 698-3 provided topic differs substantively between offerings.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Field Camp

ANTH 699 - Independent Study
Credit available for both Anth 499-3 and Anth 699-3 provided topic differs substantively between offerings.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed


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