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2020 September Semester
Aug 05, 2020
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EDUC 101 - Introduction to Education
This course is intended to provide students with an understanding of the basic issues facing elementary and secondary teachers in Canadian schools. The topics to be covered include: social, emotional, cognitive and physical development, classroom management, social and economic issues, gender, multiculturalism, teacher characteristics, special needs, and reflective practice. It introduces students to the values, concepts, expectations, and responsibilities of classroom teachers. The course will also acquaint students with the British Columbia Teachers' Federation Guide to Professional Practice.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 201 - Education Theory and Practice
In this course, students will extend their understanding of contemporary educational issues. The course introduces theoretical models of curriculum and instruction, as well as provincial curricular guidelines. Students will reflect on practical aspects of teaching and learning, and they will identify their own beliefs and aims with respect to teaching. This course builds on and complements the topics addressed in EDUC 101.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

EDUC 313 - Interpersonal Communication (Business and Career Education)
An introduction to basic interpersonal communication skills applicable to teaching across the grade levels. The course focuses on developmentally appropriate and effective communication in one-to-one, small-group, and whole-class contexts when listening, imparting information, giving instructions, and facilitating discussion. Other topics include: understanding diverse perspectives, establishing equitable discourse opportunities, reflective listening, negotiation, and problem-solving.
Credits: 1.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 333 - Learning, Development, and Motivation
Human social, emotional, cognitive, linguistic, and physical development and learning across the life span. In particular, the emphasis is children's and adolescents' development during the school years and implications for teaching and learning. Topics will include: theories of development; age-related social, behavioral, and academic expectations; developmental diversity; social, cultural, and gender bases of identity; and the teacher's role in creating developmentally appropriate, nurturing environments for learning. Students will complete a term project relevant to their educational stream (Early Years or Senior Years).
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 336 - Inclusive Education: Success for All
This course focuses on inclusive teaching strategies across curricula, assessment, and classroom management. This course addresses inclusion based on the premise that all students have individual differences and that health within classrooms depends on celebrating differences. Students’ differences include, but are not limited to, experiences, skills, knowledge, perspectives and cultural beliefs. Inclusive educators consider pedagogical components and strategies when selecting, designing and adapting their classroom and learning activities to include all learners.
Credits: 3.000 OR 4.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

EDUC 340 - Curriculum Development Models
Practical approaches to the development and evaluation of curricula, placed within a theoretical framework. Topics will include: epistemological foundations of curriculum, curricular intergration and disciplinary, socio-cultural perspectives and equity, collaborative development, evaluative purposes and approaches, curricular leadership, and the teacher as researcher. This course perpares students for curriculum and instruction pedagogy courses in specific subject areas.
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 341 - Principles of Inquiry-Based Instruction
This course embeds learning about theoretical foundations and practical applications of instructional psychology within the context of elementary and secondary school settings. The course is based on a model of professional inquiry to explore some of the contemporary theories that support student learning. It requires teacher candidates to explore inquiry-based learning within an adult context which leads student-based inquiry learning in their classrooms.
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

EDUC 342 - Social Dynamics of Classrooms
This course addresses the social dynamics of classrooms and introduces contemporary approaches to classroom management. Through a combination of lecture, discussion, small group activities, and case analysis, we will address the following central topics: foundations of classroom management, interpersonal relationships in classrooms, effective instruction to promote learning and motivation, classroom organization and management, and approaches to exceptional cases. Students will interrogate their own assumptions about the roles of teachers and students, and will develop practical strategies for classroom management and discipline.
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 345 - Language and Literacy across the Curriculum
In this course, Senior Years students study the role of language as a medium of teaching and learning, and develop approaches to integrating spoken and written language across subject areas to enhance learning. The course includes a substantive focus on English as a Second Language/English as a Second Dialect. Other topics include the nature of language, classroom discourse, narrative, and journals, the construction of meaning, writing and cognition, and diverse oral and literate traditions. The course includes a focus on strategies for intergrating language within specific subject areas.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

EDUC 346 - Aboriginal and Indigenous Education
This course provides teacher candidates with a deep understanding of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Calls to Action. Teacher candidates build their knowledge by embedding cultural and Indigenous and Aboriginal perspectives, and develop an understanding of oral history and the Indigenous perspectives on historical and current issues. They explore, design and examine pedagogical strategies to support learners in the classroom.
Credits: 2.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

EDUC 351 - Curriculum and Instruction: Second Language
This course provides Elementary teacher candidates with curricular, instructional and assessment methods for teaching a second language. The second language offered may be French, or another provincially approved second language, such as a local Indigenous language. Teacher candidates develop a deep understanding of second language acquisition and development; research-informed pedagogical content knowledge; and ways to personalize classroom learning.
Credits: 2.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

EDUC 356 - Language and Literacy: Development (EY)
An introduction to the nature of language and literacy, and their development prior to and during the early years of schooling. The course will focus on the components of language and literacy development. Students will learn the curricular expectations for grades K to 5 for listening, speaking, reading, writing, and spelling, and will be introduced to instructional strategies for oral language and emergent/early literacy.
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 357 - Language and Literacy: Reading and Writing (EY)
This course examines the theoretical models of reading, spelling, and writing processes during the early years. It also includes practical skills and experience in assessing reading, writing, and spelling, planning instruction in these areas, using curricular and other resources, and adapting instruction for diverse learners.
Credits: 4.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

EDUC 358 - Language and Literacy: Reading, Writing, and Inquiry Content
This course provides current models of early years reading and writing as well as content inquiry processes. It also includes assessment tools for reading, writing, and spelling. Students experience planning instruction in these areas. Adaptions and extensions in instruction and assessment across diverse learners are explored and shared.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

EDUC 360 - Curriculum and Instruction: Introduction (SY)
Curriculum and instruction methods for the Senior Years, including accessing, selecting, and developing curricular materials; and planning instruction, and evaluation methods pertaining to the teachable subject areas.
Credits: 4.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 361 - Curriculum and Instruction Secondary Humanities
This course investigates curriculum and instruction methods in English language arts and social studies in Grades 8-12. The first part of the course focuses on language and literacy with emphasis on strategies for thematic instruction, cross-curricular teaching, Canadian texts, and First Peoples’ Principles across the curriculum. The second part promotes English language arts and social studies across the secondary humanities curriculum by promoting the use of Indigenous and non-Indigenous texts to explore social justice themes, First Nations history and pedagogy.
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 366 - Curriculum and Instruction: Social Studies (EY)
The theory and practice of social studies education in the early years, including objectives, teaching and assessment approaches, curricular models, and resources/materials. Students will examine the nature and purpose of social studies, and will become familiarized with the BC social studies curriculum for the early years, as well as with accessing, selecting, and developing curricular materials. The course will emphasize strategies for thematic instruction, and integration of social studies themes across the curriculum.
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 370 - Numeracy across the Curriculum (SY)
An exploration of the role of numeracy in society and across disciplines. This course includes strategies for fostering quantitative literacy across Senior Years subject areas.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

EDUC 372 - Curriculum and Instruction Mathematics and Science
This course is intended for Secondary teacher candidates with a Mathematics and Science specialization. Teacher candidates integrate subject-specific pedagogies, theories, practices, professional ethics and safety protocols. Themes include experiential and reflexive learning; First Peoples’ Principles; and cross-curricular teaching and learning using Applied Design Skills and Technologies (ADST).
Credits: 0.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 376 - Numeracy: Math Concepts (EY)
This course prepares prospective teachers to teach early years mathematics by 1) improving their knowledge of mathematics, 2) introducing them to the development of numeracy in young children, 3) familiarizing them with the BC mathematics curriculum for the early years; and 4) building connections between mathematical knowledge, development, curricular guidelines, and instructional strategies.
Credits: 0.000 TO 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Tutorial

EDUC 377 - Numeracy: Instructional Strategies (EY)
Topics include accessing, selecting, and developing curricular materials; and planning, instruction, and evaluation methods pertaining to early years mathematics. Instructional strategies will emphasize problem solving, learning with manipulatives, mathematical language, group work, and other process-oriented approaches, as well as choosing and using resources such as math manipulatives and Montessori materials, print materials, computer software, videos, and calculators. Students also will explore ways to integrate numeracy across the curriculum, such as through thematic instruction.
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 380 - Foundations of Education
Introduction to the historical, philosophical, psychological, and sociological foundations of education. Students will reflect on their beliefs about education and teaching, including their assumptions about gender, culture, race, and social class. This course will include an emphasis on the historical roots of present educational institutions and approaches, and change processes in education as applied to the contemporary Canadian social and educational contexts.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 387 - Curriculum and Instruction: Science (EY)
Students will be introduced to the theory and practice of teaching children science, and to the BC curriculum. The course addresses curriculum and instruction methods for the early years, including accessing, selecting, and developing curricular materials and activities; and planning, instruction, and evaluation methods pertaining to early years science. Students also will explore ways to integrate science across the curriculum, such as through thematic instruction.
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 390 - Observational Practicum
This course provides Teacher candidates with the skill sets required to better understand the complexities of teaching and learning. Teacher candidates participate in an observational practicum in K-12 classrooms and alternative education settings. Mentors guide discussions addressing ongoing practice issues to provide teacher candidates opportunities to reflect on and problem-solve real life and case study issues. This course helps teacher candidates assess current resources, address professional issues and experience the role of teacher as researcher. Graded on a PASS/FAIL basis.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Practicum

EDUC 391 - Experiential Practicum
This course provides teacher candidates with the skill sets needed to participate in an experiential practicum. During their time in classrooms, teacher candidates participate in self-reflection, planning, teaching, assessing and reflecting on students' learning. Immersion in reflective practices includes participating in groups to provide ongoing mutual support and guidance as they participate in inquiry and problem-solving. Graded on a PASS/FAIL basis.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Practicum

EDUC 392 - Classroom Practice and Seminar: First Nations Language and Culture
This three-week equivalent practicum provides teacher candidates enrolled in the Education Diploma in a First Nations Language and Culture program (Elementary Years) with supervised practical experience in a school classroom setting that offers, as part of its mandate, instruction in a First Nations Language and Culture. As part of the practicum experience, weekly seminars address ongoing practical issues confronting teachers of First Nations languages and cultures including pedagogy, classroom management, reflection, learning resources, and professional concerns. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Practicum, Seminar

EDUC 393 - Foundations of Education
This course introduces the historical, philosophical, sociological and ethical foundations of education. Teacher candidates connect the BC Teachers’ Council code of practice standards to curriculum policies in public and independent schools in British Columbia and Canada in general. Teacher candidates practice and discuss critical reasoning and ethical decision-making in the professional context.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 394 - Pedagogy, Curriculum and Teaching - Theory in Context
This course provides teacher candidates with an introduction to and development of a skill set to fluently engage with BC's curriculum. Teacher candidates develop an understanding of curriculum content and competency integration, and of the importance of differentiated instruction that enables student success. Teacher candidates also integrate the cycle of assessment and evaluation to inform instruction with ways to keep students at the center of the learning. Finally, teacher candidates examine the role of teachers as researchers, learners and leaders of learning.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 396 - Reflective Seminar
In this course, students reflect on their experiences in Aboriginal Language and Culture classrooms and compare those teaching contexts with curriculum and instruction expectations in corss-curricular classrooms. The course reviews theoretical models of curriculum and instruction and provincial curricular guidelines across the elementary curriculum.

Prerequisite: An Education Diploma in a First Nations Language and Culture, or equivalent.


Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 397 - Curriculum and Instruction in the Humanities K-7 using ADST
This course prepares Elementary teacher candidates for the teaching of humanities. It emphasizes literacy, spoken and written language across subject areas, and social studies pedagogy, while integrating theory and practice with critical reflection. Other focuses include the development of Applied Design Skills and Technologies (ADST) and First Nations’ pedagogical knowledge, along with the assessment and evaluation of diverse learners.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 398 - Curriculum and Instruction in Math and Science using ADST
Quantitative and scientific literacy are essential competencies for teacher candidates in order to educate students for the world and the future. This course focuses on literacy areas while developing and refining the skills and mindsets required for logical reasoning, analytical thought, problem solving, creative thinking, and ethical decision-making. These competencies are based on the collection, analysis and effective communication of data, in addition to problem solving in situational contexts.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 399 - Integrating ADST as a Pedagogical Stance
This course provides teacher candidates with opportunities to explore, inquire about and understand the value of experiential learning for their students. Teacher candidates begin to develop their own pedagogical stances, recognizing the importance of hands-on learning. As expressed in the BC Ministry of Education’s curriculum - Applied Design, Skills and Technologies (ADST), experiential learning provides opportunities for students to build on their own natural curiosity, inventiveness, and desire to create and work in practical ways.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 400 - Curricular Enactment in Elementary Years with a Focus on Fine Arts, Literacy and Numeracy
This course introduces teacher candidates to alternate ways for students in the classroom to demonstrate learning through personal aptitudes, values and beliefs. Teacher candidates explore a variety of skill sets involving curricular integration and enactment through fine arts, music, health, physical education, drama, dance, performance and imagery. Teacher candidates develop knowledge representation skill sets through emergent and early language literacy, numeracy, wellness, sustainable health, and career education.
Credits: 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 401 - Career Education
This course provides teacher candidates with an understanding of career education, career-life education, capstones and career-life connection. Topics include portfolio development and assessment using learner-centered features, financial and career literacy, interpersonal and intrapersonal skills, and acceptance of diversity (cultural, gender, intellectual and physical). Teacher candidates integrate theory and practice throughout the course to develop pedagogy and assessment practices.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 402 - Diverse Classrooms
In this course, teacher candidates address multiculturalism in classrooms, explore issues related to religion and religious diversity, engage in Truth and Reconciliation calls to action and what they mean in a local context, and deepen their understanding of the lived experiences of new Canadians in classrooms. This course integrates theory and practice to discover how diverse classrooms influence and inform pedagogy, mindset, and assessment strategies. This course provides teacher candidates with the skills and theories needed to teach English Language Learners effectively.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 403 - Mental Health and Wellness
This course provides teacher candidates with the skill sets required to develop an understanding of the well-being of the self and of all members of the school community. Teacher candidates develop trauma-informed pedagogy and practice to support students' development of resilience behaviours and positive mental health. They examine the meaning of professionalism through an examination of the BC Teachers’ Federation (BCTF) Code of Ethics and BC Teachers’ Council (BCTC) Professional Standards. Workplace culture is examined through a lens of collaboration and an understanding of the many roles of the educator.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 405 - Reflective Practice Through Inquiry and e-Portfolio
This course provides teacher candidates with an introduction to, and early development of, a skill set to sustain an e-Portfolio that records transformative inquiry over the journey of becoming a reflective practitioner. Teacher candidates focus on introspection and have the opportunity to examine their emerging personal and professional identity as they engage in continuous learning that is focused on their transformation from student to educator. Teacher candidates examine a number of digital tools that allow them to self-assess and document their growth, and develop an understanding of current digital literacies to help communicate student learning to parents.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 406 - Curriculum and Instruction: Fine Arts (EY)
Introduction to the role of music, visual arts, dance, and drama in teaching and learning during the early years. The course includes a focus on appreciating the arts of our diverse communities and understanding children's expressive development, as well as practical approaches to teaching these arts, using tools for art-making, and providing contexts for the performance arts. Strategies for incorporating music, imagery, and performance across the curriculum will be emphasized.
Credits: 0.000 TO 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Tutorial

EDUC 407 - Curriculum and Instruction: Fine Arts/Physical and Health Education (EY)
This course is an introduction to the role of music, visual arts, dance, drama, and physical and health education in teaching and learning during the elementary years. It includes a focus on appreciating the arts of our diverse communities and understanding children’s expressive development. It also considers practical approaches to teaching fine arts and physical and health education. Additionally, it provides the foundational and instructional basis for planning and implementing physical and health education programs in the elementary years.
Credits: 4.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

EDUC 413 - Counselling Skills (EY & SY)
This course is an introduction to the role of the classroom teacher related to collegial work with counsellors, support personnel, school-based teams, and families. Topics include working with parents, working with school-based teams, understanding the role of the school counsellor, communicating with teaching assistants, accessing resources, and teaching Career Education K-12.
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 414 - Curriculum and Instruction: III (Business and Career Education)
Curriculum and instruction methods for the senior years, including accessing, selecting, and developing curricular materials; and planning, instructional, and evaluation methods pertaining to the teachable subject areas.
Credits: 5.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 421 - Assessment and Motivation
This course provides teacher candidates with skills in classroom assessment for all levels of ability and helps teacher candidates understand the deep connection between assessment, evaluation, student learning, motivation and behaviour. Teacher candidates explore the importance of motivation and engagement in developing classroom communities of learning.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 431 - Educational Technology
This course is intended to provide students with the understanding and skills needed to effectively integrate computer based technology in an educational setting. The topics to be covered focus on the use of technology in a school setting and include operations and concepts, professional practice, and technology issues (OS and DOS Platforms). It introduces students to the values, concepts, expectations, and responsibilities of classroon teachers with respect to technology and issues arising from its use.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Tutorial

EDUC 435 - Learning and Diversity: Inclusive Classrooms
This course addresses individual differences and inclusion based on the premise that all students have individual differences in their experiences, skills, knowledge, perspectives, and cultural beliefs; and that curricular materials and instruction must be selected, designed, and adapted to include all learners. Within this wider philosophical framework, particular focuses of the course will include: history of special education and contemporary approaches; working with students with physical, intellectual, or emotional/behavioral challenges or talents; individualized education plans; assessment; the team approach; and accommodating social, cultural, and linguistic diversity.
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 436 - Learning and Diversity: Learning Disabilities
This course explores the theoretical bases of learning disabilities; and strategies for assessment, instruction, and coordination of resources to support learners with LD across the developmental levels. Characteristics and educational implications of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Effects also will be introduced, and practical instructional approaches explored.
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 441 - Innovative Community-Based Approaches to Responsive Education (SY)
In this course teacher candidates research collaboratively, plan, teach, assess and reflect actively on classroom practices with real-time coaching from classroom teachers and university instructors. Teacher candidates develop deep understanding of ways to embed Aboriginal and Indigenous perspectives into experiential, subject-based learning and classroom organization. Teacher candidates apply teaching strategies in order to link research and theory to practice and student-led inquiry and to develop personalized pedagogical stances.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

EDUC 446 - Aboriginal and Indigenous Education: Epistemology
This course emphasizes the importance of people, place and land to learning. Teacher candidates engage in experiential learning opportunities learning about current First Nations pedagogies and issues. Teacher candidates are guided to appropriately design curricula that embed First Peoples Principles of Learning and to develop curricular themes with goals in each of the four directions—Spiritual, Emotional, Intellectual and Physical.
Credits: 2.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 456 - Language and Literacy: Across the Curriculum (EY)
In this course, students will study the role of language as a medium of teaching and learning in the early years, and develop approaches to integrating spoken and written language across subject areas such as language arts, math, music, science, and social studies. The course includes a substantive focus on English as a Second Language/English as a Second Dialect. Other topics include: classroom discourse, construction of meaning, narratives and journals, writing and cognition, and diverse oral traditions. The course includes a practical focus on learning to use effective instructional language, designing thematic instruction, creating literacy-rich classroom environments, providing diverse routes to learning, and managing student discussion in whole-class and small-group contexts.
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 460 - Curriculum and Instruction: III (Humanities Social Sciences)
Curriculum and instruction methods for the senior years, including accessing, selecting, and developing curricular materials; and planning, instruction, and evaluation methods pertaining to the teachable subject areas.
Credits: 5.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 471 - Curriculum and Instruction: III (Math, Computers, and Sciences)
Curriculum and instruction methods for the senior years, including accessing, selecting, and developing curricular materials; and planning, instruction, and evaluation methods pertaining to the teachable subject areas.
Credits: 5.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 489 - Curriculum and Instruction: IV Physical Education (EY)
Foundational and instructional basis for planning and implementing physical education programs in the early years.
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 490 - Formative Practicum
This course contributes to meeting BC Teachers’ Council (BCTC) practicum requirements. During the university instruction and in-situ learning of this practicum, teacher candidates develop a deeper understanding of teaching by integrating theory into practice and have a first opportunity to independently lead a classroom. Teacher candidates document the journey through continued use of e-Portfolios to demonstrate and articulate an increasing awareness of practical skill sets. This course supports a deepening awareness and facilitation of BC curriculum. Graded on a PASS/FAIL basis.
Credits: 3.000 OR 4.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Practicum, Seminar

EDUC 491 - Summative Practicum
This course is a summative practicum that prepares teacher candidates to meet BC Teachers’ Council (BCTC) practicum requirements. During the university instruction and in-situ learning of this summative practicum, teacher candidates develop the necessary experience and knowledge to advance BC curriculum and pedagogical knowledge for learners. Teacher candidates demonstrate a thorough understanding and practice of ethics, standards, and teaching as a profession. This course is graded on a PASS/FAIL basis.
Credits: 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Practicum

EDUC 500 - Teacher Leadership
This course is based on the premise that all teachers can engage in teacher leadership through formal or informal roles to influence social conditions and instructional effectiveness within and beyond their classrooms. Students prepare for leadership opportunities by exploring strategies for goal setting, enhancing communication and trust, motivating and energizing colleagues, and implementing change for improved teacher and student achievement. There is an emphasis on how to build communities of practice or professional learning communities in school contexts.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Seminar, World Wide Web

EDUC 502 - Interpretation and Application of Educational Research
This course exposes teachers to both quantitative and qualitative educational research. Students are expected to read and interpret research in the literature. Successful students may plan to apply existing research knowledge in classrooms and schools or to develop new knowledge related to implementation of innovations in their own settings.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 504 - Instructional Leadership for Cooperating Teachers
This course is open to classroom teachers who have sponsored an extended practicum for a UNBC B.Ed. student. The course consists of an orientation workshop, the practicum itself, and a final weekend seminar to reflect on the mentorship experiences in light of the instructional leadership literature.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 521 - Classroom Assessment Practices
This course examines the relationships between the purposes and practices of classroom-based assessment and evaluation. Teachers will consider the roles of formative and summative assessment, including dynamic assessment, curriculum-based assessment, portfolios, conferencing, and standardized testing; and the implications of such practices for grading, instructional approaches, school achievement, and planning for diverse students. Emphasis on the practical component allows exploration of effective assessment practices and interpretation of assessment results, as well as responses to current trends in educational evaluation.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 523 - Teaching for Social Responsibility
This course explores the implications of improved social responsibility as a school or district improvement goal, and assists teachers in developing classroom and school wide strategies to achieve that goal. Course topics include personal planning curricula, social dynamics, and strategies for improving communication, relationships, and community identity in classrooms and schools.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 528 - Numeracy Strategies for Struggling Learners
This course is an overview of diagnostic and remedial strategies for mathematics. Students will be provided with an overview of individualised assessment, including formal standardised instruments, informal tests, and classroom- based tools and instruction on remedial strategies specific to math errors and deficiencies. There will also be a field application in the form of a brief math clinic in which the students will work in a semi-supervised setting with one remedial math child out of which a final report will be produced.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 531 - Applications of Educational Technology
This course introduces students to the various computer programs available to practising teachers with a particular emphasis on construction of web-based resources. As well, it examines the role of computer technology as a teaching and learning resource in contemporary educational environments.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Laboratory

EDUC 533 - Human Development: Implications for Education
Contemporary theories of human development are examined along with their implications for teaching and counseling children, adolescents, and adults. The course invites teachers to identify the theories that guide their own practice and make plans to implement espoused theories more consistently.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 534 - Achievement Motivation
This course addresses current literature on achievement motivation, grounded in practical classroom and school-based examples. The examination is practice oriented and teachers focus on shaping inferences from the literature for local application. A central issue is how teachers can understand and foster students' motivation for school learning.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 535 - Learning & Diversity: Inclusive Classrooms
This course addresses individual differences and inclusion based on the premises that all students have individual differences in their experiences, skills, knowledge, perspectives, and cultural beliefs; and that the curricular materials and instruction must be selected, designed, and adapted to include all learners. Within this wider philosophical framework, particular focus of the course will include: history of special education and contemporary approaches; working with students with physical, intellectual, emotional/behavioural challenges or talents; individualized education plans; assessment; the team approach; and accommodating social, cultural, and linguistic diversity.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 541 - Principles of Instruction
This course provides an examination of current instructional trends and strategies and the opportunities and challenges in their implementation. Teachers will be encouraged to identify, reflect on, and expand their curriculum planning tools and instructional repertoires.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 546 - First Nations Education
This course reviews the diverse meanings of First Nations or Aboriginal education. The concepts of power, control, and culture will help teachers analyze current practice. Topics include: historical analysis, contemporary issues, and promising practices for increasing Aboriginal school success. Teachers will build their knowledge and understanding of Aboriginal approaches to education.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 551 - Mathematics Education
This course provides a critical examination of current practices and emerging trends in K-12 mathematics curriculum planning and instruction. Teachers may elect to focus on either the elementary or secondary level of the curriculum.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 552 - Science Education
This course provides a critical examination of current practices and emerging trends in K-12 science curriculum planning and instruction. Teachers may elect to focus on either the elementary or secondary level of the curriculum.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Laboratory, Seminar

EDUC 558 - Language Arts Education
This course provides a critical examination of current practices and emerging trends in K-12 language arts curriculum planning and instruction, including aspects of language, literacy, and literature. Topics will include the writing process, reader response, and children's or young adult literature as welll as current approaches to teaching reading. Teachers may elect to focus on either the elementary or secondary level of the curriculum.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 559 - Second Language Instruction
This course provides a critical examination of current practices and emerging trends in K-12 second language curriculum planning and instruction. The language offered may be French or another provinicially approved second language, such as a First Nations language. Teachers may elect to focus on either the elementary or secondary level of the curriculum.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 573 - Montessori Curriculum and Instruction - Scientific Literacy
This course focuses on the development and refinement of knowledge and skills necessary for full implementation of the Montessori approach to Cosmic Education and the elementary cultural studies curriculum. The course provides a constructivist approach to the integration of Cosmic Education, Science and Practical Life/Technology. Through hands on experience, research, small group projects, lecture, and demonstration students develop and refine competency in scientific literacy.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 574 - Montessori Curriculum and Instruction - Mathematics Education
This course is designed to prepare the student to present the Montessori mathematics curriculum and facilitate the development of mathematics in a Montessori Elementary class (ages 6-12). Demonstration, lecture presentations, and supervised practice with didactic materials provide links between Montessori pedagogy and mathematical concepts.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 575 - Montessori Integrated Cultural Studies and Field Study Planning
In this course, students research, design, and demonstrate appropriate materials and activities that reflect an integration of history, geography, the sciences, and creative arts. Topics include the scope and importance of movement, nutrition and physical exercise for the development of the whole child and an understanding of an integrated and interdisciplinary approach to education and an ability to apply Montessori principles in preparation for a field study and portfolio. Lecture, demonstration, field trips, discussion, participation in physical activities, and individual research projects are utilized.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 576 - Montessori Integrated Cultural Studies Field Study
The function of the Field Study/Practicum Phase is to provide for the student a supervised teaching/learning experience and a period of observation, internalization, and further study, to bring together the theory and practice of Montessori Education.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 577 - Montessori Portfolio
This course is the culmination of the Montessori Education Program and results in the production of a print-based or electronic portfolio. Students provide artifacts from their coursework and professional experience that demonstrate a definite understanding of the Montessori theory and practice. The media include video, audio, student assessment, and any related evidence.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 580 - Visual Arts Across the Curriculum
This course provides an exploration of the role of the visual arts (drawing, painting, sculpture, mixed media) for teaching and learning in the K-12 curriculum. Strategies for incorporating the visual arts as means of expressing learning in subject areas across the curriculum will be emphasized. Teachers may elect to focus on either the elementary or secondary level of the curriculum.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Laboratory, Seminar

EDUC 581 - Performing Arts Across the Curriculum
This course provides an exploration of the role of the performing arts (music, dance, and drama) for teaching and learning in the K-12 curriculum. Strategies for incorporating the peforming arts as means of expressing learning in subject areas across the curriculum will be emphasized. Teachers may elect to focus on either the elementary or secondary level of the curriculum.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Laboratory, Seminar

EDUC 592 - Special Topics
Topics to be determined by the special interests of students and the availability of faculty members to teach those topics. Special topics courses at this level will emphasize the analysis and improvement of classroom practice in light of current literature. There is no limit to the number of special topics courses that can be taken as credit toward a Post-Baccalaureate Diploma.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar

EDUC 593 - Directed Readings
This course provides an opportunity for students to study an educational topic relevant to their program. Directed readings courses at this level will emphasize the analysis and improvement of classroom practice in light of current literature. The delivery of directed readings courses is subject to the availability of instructors.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed

EDUC 601 - Educational Research Design and Methodology
An introduction to quantitative and qualitative paradigms of educational inquiry, the formulation of research questions, the consideration of ethical issues, the principal types and methods of educational research, the preparation of research proposals, and the reporting of research results. Students will be encouraged and assisted to utilize this course to develop either a thesis or project proposal that will satisfy the research requirements of the MEd degree program.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, World Wide Web

EDUC 602 - Quantitative Research Design and Data Analysis
(Lecture/Lab) This course is an introduction to the descriptive and inferential univariate statistics commonly used to quantitatively analyze social sciences research data. Topics include graphing, central tendency and dispersion measures, standard scores, data cleaning, hypothesis testing, correlation, simple linear regression, nonparametric statistics, and an introduction to ANOVA, including factorial ANOVA, with multiple comparisons. Research methodology is integrated throughout the course. The student is given instruction in common word processing and spreadsheet programs for the purpose of statistical analysis and reporting.
Credits: 0.000 OR 4.000

Levels: Graduate, Doctoral
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, World Wide Web

EDUC 603 - Advanced Quantitative Data Analysis
(Lecture/Lab) This course provides an examination of a variety of advanced (generally multivariate) methods of quantitatively analyzing social science research data. Selected topics include: introductory matrix algebra, a review and an extension of ANOVA techniques introduced in EDUC 602-4 including ANCOVA, MANOVA, and MANCOVA, multiple linear, and logistic regression, and factor analysis. Additional methodological and/or analytic topics are included in accord with the expressed research interests and needs of students. The student is given instruction in one or more common statistical programs.
Credits: 4.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

EDUC 606 - Leading For Change
This course reviews contemporary management and organizational theory emphasizing the role that leaders can play in facilitating and managing change. Other areas of focus include developing a learning organization, organizational responsiveness, processes of organizational change and improvement, strategic planning, and program evaluation. By highlighting the accountability policy trends in BC and Canadian schools, this course emphasizes the links between theory and practice.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Seminar, World Wide Web

EDUC 609 - Aboriginal/Indigenous Learners: History, Culture, and Ways of Knowing
This course explores the difficult history Aboriginal/Indigenous people have with Western education. It also explores Indigenous ways of knowing, contemporary educational theory, and instructional practices in relation to the needs and resources of Aboriginal/Indigenous students in rural and urban northern communities. Students are encouraged to examine achievement data and to explore cultural assumptions around definitions of Aboriginal/Indigenous student success. Students consider the cultural relevance of teaching resources, assessment tools, and school improvement interventions. Issues of Aboriginal/Indigenous access, retention, and participation in education systems are emphasized, along with the need for rebuilding trust among educational institutions and Aboriginal/Indigenous communities.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

EDUC 610 - Qualitative Analysis in Education
(Lecture/Lab) This course provides an introduction to the conceptual underpinnings of qualitative research and to qualitative data analysis methods, including case studies, discourse analysis, grounded theory, action research, phenomenology, narrative inquiry and ethnography. The course includes a lab in which students learn hand coding and analysis and are introduced to the use of qualitative analysis software.
Credits: 0.000 OR 4.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, World Wide Web

EDUC 611 - Advanced Topics in Qualitative Research
This course is an exploration of epistemological issues in qualitative research, including ethics, researcher role, reflexivity, voice, and interpretation. The course includes in-depth study and application of one or more of the qualitative approaches to analysis introduced in EDUC 610-4.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Seminar

EDUC 613 - Interpersonal Counselling Skills
This course explores the theory and practice of interpersonal communication and helping skills in counselling. It provides opportunity within the classroom setting to practice and receive feedback on basic helping and communication skills.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed

EDUC 615 - The School Principalship
This course explores the skills, knowledge and personal attributes central to effective school leadership in British Columbia. It emphasizes the legal and policy context for schools by examining school law (legal duties and responsibilities), collective bargaining and school finance; and it explores effective interpersonal and supervisory skills in the workplace. Examples from the field experiences and the instructor permit opportunities for developing personal praxis.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Seminar, World Wide Web

EDUC 616 - Policy and Politics in Public Education
This course examines the politics of education at the local, provincial and national levels by considering the governance structures, patterns or trends in education and political influences on educational decision makers. Emphasis is placed on the policy process. Both the theory and practice of policy development are explored including agenda setting, stakeholder influence, bureaucratic systems, policy design, implementation and evaluation, and the principles and processes of inclusive decision-making.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Final Exam, Audio/Video, Seminar, World Wide Web

EDUC 617 - Leading for Learning: Teacher Leadership and Principal Preparation
This course provides an overview of the skills, knowledge, and personal attributes central to effective teacher leadership and principal leadership in schools in British Columbia. It features a current emphasis on distributed leadership and on various kinds of influence within schools that function as sustainable learning communities. The course explores collegial relationships as a background for instructional improvement and invites identification of personal leadership goals as well as plans for implementation.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, World Wide Web

EDUC 618 - Family Counselling
This course is an introduction to classic and postmodern theories of family counselling including Bowen, Structural, Strategic, and Experiential Family Therapies. Application of theory to practice is included.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

EDUC 619 - Counselling for Aboriginal/Indigenous Peoples
This course examines the place of counselling in the holistic context of Aboriginal/Indigenous approaches to health and healing. In particular, it examines the counselling processes that are inherent in traditional healing practices such as the sweat lodge, concentric circle, talking circle and vision quest.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

EDUC 621 - Classroom Assessment Practices
In this course, we will examine the relationships between and purposes of classroom-based assessment and evaluation. We will consider roles of formative and summative assessment, including dynamic assessment, curriculum-based assessment, portfolios, conferencing, and standardized testing; and the implications of such practices for grading, instructional approaches, school achievement, and planning for diverse students. The course includes a practical component so that students will explore effective assessment practices and how to interpret assessment results, as well as how to evaluate current trends in educational evaluation.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, World Wide Web

EDUC 622 - Psychoeducational Assessment
This course provides an overview of individualized assessment, including formal standardized instruments, informal tests, and classroom-based tools and instruction on the administration and interpretation of Level B tests. There is also a field application involving the design, administration, and interpretation of an individual assessment for learning.
Credits: 4.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, World Wide Web

EDUC 626 - Inclusive Education: Learning for All
This course presents "inclusive education" as a transition toward the predominance of a "success for all" educational philosophy. Components of inclusion include but are not limited to integration of exceptional students and examination of achievement data for minority groups. Issues of quality and equity of educational opportunity for all genders, orientations, cultures, religions, and socioeconomic groups are also explored. Connections are made to current instructional concepts such as culturally relevant practice and differentiated instruction. Students are expected to apply course content to develop action inquiry projects designed to improve equity in their own professional settings.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

EDUC 632 - Language Development: Implications for Education
An exploration of theories of language development across the lifespan, drawn from Linguistics, Psycholinguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Educational Psychology. Links between language development, and cognition, learning, and social development, and their educational implications will be addressed.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

EDUC 633 - Human Development: Implications for Education
Contemporary theories of human development are examined along with their implications for teaching and counselling children, adolescents, and adults.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, World Wide Web

EDUC 634 - Achievement Motivation
Current theories of achievement motivation, grounded in practical classroom examples. Our examination will be research oriented, ranging from a micro level of analysis (e.g., individual case studies) to a macro level of analysis (e.g., school structures). A central issue is how teachers and counsellors can understand and foster students' motivation for school learning.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

EDUC 635 - Educating Exceptional Students
An examination of the nature and characteristics of exceptional students and a review of current theory and research concerned with accommodating their special needs in a variety of educational environments; for example, counselling or instructional environments.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, World Wide Web

EDUC 636 - Language and Learning Disabilities
In this course, we will review current theoretical and research literature on language-based learning disabilities, including disabilities of oral language, reading, and written expression, and their implications for students' learning. Strategies for assessment, planning, teaching, and intervention for preschool, school-aged, and adult learners will be addressed.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, World Wide Web

EDUC 637 - Interventions for Literacy Disorders
This course provides an overview of diagnostic and remedial strategies for literacy disorders. Students are provided with an overview of individualised assessment, including informal tests, and classroom-based tools and instruction on remedial strategies specific to literacy errors and deficiencies. There is also a field application, in which students work in a supervised setting with one child exhibiting a literacy disorder, out of which a final report is produced.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Final Exam, World Wide Web

EDUC 638 - Mathematic Disorders and Remediation
This course provides an overview of diagnostic and remedial strategies for mathematics. Students are provided with an overview of individualised assessment, including formal standardised instruments, informal tests, and classroom-based tools and instruction on remedial strategies specific to mathematics errors and deficiencies. There is also a field application, in the form of a brief mathematics clinic in which students work in a supervised setting with one remedial mathematics child, out of which a final report is produced.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Final Exam, World Wide Web

EDUC 639 - School-Based Teams, Consultants, and Families
This course is an overview of the strategies, policies, and procedures related to school-based team meetings. Included is a review of the professional literature, a description of the roles and responsibilities of team members such as teachers, administrators, parents, students, and families, and an analysis of the techniques used in school-based team meetings.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Final Exam, World Wide Web

EDUC 640 - Focus on a Selected Disability
This course examines a specific special need, with topics determined by the interests of students and the availability of faculty members to teach them. For example, it may focus in depth on educational aspects of a specific disability or range of isabilities, such as FASD, Autism Spectrum Disorder, hearing disability and deafness, or visual impairment. This course may be taken up to two times but with a different disability focus each time.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Final Exam, World Wide Web

EDUC 642 - Personal and Career Planning for Students with Special Needs
This course is an evaluative survey of theories and practices employed to facilitate career decision making for students with special needs.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Laboratory, Seminar, World Wide Web

EDUC 651 - Mathematics Education
A critical examination of theory and research associated with current practices and emerging trends in curriculum development and instruction in mathematics. Students may elect to focus upon either the elementary or secondary level of the curriculum.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

EDUC 653 - Social Studies Education
A critical examination of theory and research associated with current practices and emerging trends in curriculum development and instruction in social studies. Students may elect to focus upon either the elementary or secondary level of the curriculum.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

EDUC 655 - Collaboration, Communication and Community: Leaders as Community Builders
This course examines the need for collaboration and communication as tools for managing the social and cultural complex environment of schools and communities. Areas of focus include the principles of effective communication and inclusive decision-making, the principles of diversity and inclusion, media and public relations, and the application of new technologies to promote dialogue.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Seminar, World Wide Web

EDUC 656 - Instructional Leadership
This course explores the principles and practices of designing curriculum and instructional systems, while also exploring the role of instructional leaders in creating a positive culture that enhances both teacher and student learning. The course is also useful to the future school principal interested in models of supervision and its relationship to instructional planning and implementation. Other topics include adult development, reflective practice and professional growth models.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Seminar, World Wide Web

EDUC 671 - Reconciling Space and Practice: Ways of Knowing and Being
This course explores the Aboriginal, Indigenous and First Nations curricula development, teaching practices, and methodology within the context of Canadian education and society. Based upon these various perspectives, students foster a personal and professional foundation for education and leadership. An essential part of this course is developing an awareness of the powerful, dynamic aspects of orality and the integration of orality within education and leadership.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 672 - Reflective and Transformative Practices in Educational Contexts
This course provides examinations of educational perspectives and practices that address conformity and adaptation to realities in today’s world. Learners participate in reflections and dialogues to formulate transformative positions in the development of educational programs. The course integrates ideas, concepts and understandings of educational leadership in diverse contexts.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 673 - Using Research to Inform Practice and Policy
This course explores and discovers the role of literature and research in academic, professional and personal settings. Learners examine how literature serves to inform practice, policy and practice. Learners explore a variety of research approaches informing the work of Public Intellectuals and Thought Leaders. The course provides research approaches consistent with Indigenous and Intercultural research that inform issues, ethics and methods.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 674 - Mental Health Disorders in Exceptionality Education
This course provides an overview of four common mental health disorders in relation to Exceptionality Education. Students research and evaluate strategies to teach their students with mental health disorders and ways to interact confidently with colleagues, parents, and paraprofessionals about mental health issues.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 675 - So You Want to Change the World
This course examines the cultural, social, political and economic factors influencing systems and communities. Learners examine self as leader and consider frameworks, models, and theories of transformational leadership, leading for change, and compassionate disruption.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 676 - Policy, Governance and Ethical Decision Making
This course will investigate and analyze policy and regulations, governance procedures, and ethical decision-making processes that support systems. Coherence and policy alignment are essential for systems to be successful and effective and should be aligned to current beliefs and values.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 677 - Decolonizing Education
This course focuses on decolonizing systems and practice. How can Indigenous Worldviews and perspectives be visible and embedded in everything that we do? Learners develop an understanding of the colonial history in Canada and Canadian educational systems including but not exclusive to a critical examination of systems and policies. This course offers opportunities to see ways that leadership may shift the course of action for reconciliation.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 678 - Leadership for Equity and Inclusion
Equity and inequity are systemic. What does it mean to have an inclusive system and inclusive systemic leadership? How do leaders create a more equitable educational system by humanizing pedagogy and practices? This course explores how to know your peers, colleagues, and self. Learners examine understanding of one’s biases and preferences while moving to a more heightened and adaptive multi-cultural lens by implementing the First Peoples Principles of Learning.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 679 - Small is Beautiful: The Power of Small
Small is a relative term. This course engages learners to imagine, realize, and recognize innovation in their local communities. Constructing and conceptualizing transformation within their workplace and community includes cultural, social, and economical components to bring about innovation in practice, in workplaces, and in collaboration with others from multiple learning networks.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 680 - 'En Cha Huná: Living our Learning
This course concludes the learning experiences of the students. Students identify a problem or situation within their professional environments that require significant change or transformation. Drawing from learnings and coursework collected in digital repositories, students explore ways in which to prepare, disseminate and share knowledge as Public Intellectuals and Thought Leaders to an audience identified as relevant to their people, place, and land. Course seminars critique various dissemination options based on desired impact, potential audience, ethical issues, and knowledge mobilization.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

EDUC 690 - Health and Human Sciences: Interdisciplinary Seminar
An interdisciplinary analysis and discussion of topics of common interest to graduate students in the Faculty of Arts, Social and Health Sciences.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

EDUC 692 - Special Topics
Topics are determined by the special interests of students and the availability of faculty members to teach those topics. This course may be retaken any number of times, provided all topics are distinct.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video

EDUC 693 - Directed Reading
Independent study under the direction of a faculty member. This course provides an opportunity for students to study an educational topic relevant to their program if additional study is either desirable or necessary to correct possible deficiencies in their preparation for graduate study.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed

EDUC 711 - Counselling Theory
This course is an examination of the theoretical foundations of counselling. Topics reviewed include analytic, behavioral, cognitive, existential, person-centred, gestalt, feminist, and postmodern therapies.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video

EDUC 712 - Counselling Practice
This course is an integrative exploration of information on counselling skills, strategies, techniques, and client issues required for effective practice. It includes an overview of current versions of Brief Therapy (Solution-Focused), Narrative Therapy, and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. Individual clinical supervision of video-recorded sessions is a major component of this course.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

EDUC 714 - Group Counselling Processes
This course addresses the theory and practice of group counselling. Opportunities are provided to participate in and conduct group sessions.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

EDUC 715 - Career Counselling
This course in an evaluative survey of the counselling theories and practices employed to facilitate career decision making in schools and community agency settings.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

EDUC 716 - Clinical Counselling
This course is an examination of specific areas of clinical counselling such as behaviour disorders, mental subnormality, learning disabilities, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and personality disorders.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Audio/Video

EDUC 717 - Ethics in Counselling
This course examines ethical and legal issues found in counselling practice with individuals, couples, families, and groups. It also presents an ethical decision-making process and model for application to counselling practice dilemmas. Students become familiar with counselling codes of ethics.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

EDUC 719 - Counselling Practicum
This course includes a practicum placement in at least one school, agency or institutional setting; scheduled seminars; and individual supervision. Students are required to complete 150 hours of direct client contact time at their practicum. This course is restricted to MEd Counselling students.
Credits: 6.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Practicum

EDUC 795 - Research Seminar
A seminar focused on supporting students' ongoing work on their theses or projects. In particular, the course will identify and explain the various tasks that are typically involved in the development of a thesis or project; for example, design, implementation, analysis, interpretation and writing. Cooperative problem solving will be employed to assist students to develop their theses or project plans.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Seminar, World Wide Web

EDUC 796 - Portfolio
The portfolio route requires the successful completion of a professional portfolio that demonstrates a candidate's knowledge of education research, theory, and practice in his/her field of study (Special Education). This course enhances and reinforces a student's knowledge of educational research, theory, and practice as well as their interrelationship as evidenced by selected artifacts and accompanying rationales.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, World Wide Web

EDUC 797 - Comprehensive Examination
The comprehensive pattern of study requires the successful completion of a comprehensive examination that evaluates a candidate's knowledge of education theory and practice in his/her field of study (Counselling or Curriculum and Instruction). This program pattern is designed to enhance and reinforce a student's knowledge of both educational theory and practice as well as their interrelationship.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Comprehensive Examination, World Wide Web

EDUC 798 - MEd Project
Students are asked to develop theoretically defensible innovations in educational practice. These may include innovative curricula, instructional strategies, or counselling practices. The efficacy of the innovations must be evaluated and the results reported as a part of a formal report of the project. The completed project report must be submitted to the student's supervisory committee for evaluation.
Credits: 6.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Masters Project

EDUC 799 - MEd Thesis
Students are asked to evaluate educational theory and practice, identify a significant question and implement a research strategy that addresses the question. The completed thesis must be submitted to the student's supervisory committee for evaluation.
Credits: 9.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Masters Thesis


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