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2019 May Semester
Apr 18, 2019
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Information Select the Course Number to get further detail on the course. Select the desired Schedule Type to find available classes for the course.

ENSC 111 - Introduction to Environmental Science
This course introduces students to the discipline of environmental science. Students are exposed to a variety of environmental science topics through seminars, lectures, assignments and invited presentations. Some field trips may be required.
Credits: 1.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ENSC 150 - Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering
Environmental Engineering is introduced through the application of engineering problem-solving methods and design concepts to contemporary environmental concerns. Topics include physical, chemical, and biological fundamentals; water, soil and air pollution; water and waste water treatment; solid and hazardous waste management; and air pollution control. A tour of a wastewater treatment plant or another similar facility provides context for the lecture material.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

ENSC 151 - Engineering Tools
This course provides an introduction to engineering problem solving using common software tools, including spreadsheets, CAD, and GIS software. Case studies provide relevance and serve to bind together many of the topics covered in the course.
Credits: 1.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Laboratory

ENSC 201 - Weather and Climate
This course explains the fundamental processes of weather and climate, and leads the student toward an understanding of how the atmosphere works and how to interpret the weather. Topics introduced include: atmospheric energy, solar and terrestrial radiation, the "Greenhouse Effect", and climate change, air quality and stratospheric ozone, humidity, clouds, precipitation, storms and weather systems, hurricanes and tornadoes, stability and thunderstorms, wind and atmospheric dynamics, and weather forecasting.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ENSC 202 - Introduction to Aquatic Systems
Aquatic systems are central to all areas of life, as well as human endeavors. In addition to being the site of our earliest evolution, aquatic systems are now recognised as fundamental to the regulation of atmospheric gases and to our climate. This course provides a broad overview of the physical, chemical, geological, and biological aspects freshwater and marine systems. Human perspectives focus on the conservation and exploitation of the resources found within and below lakes, rivers and oceans. Introduction to Aquatic Systems will provide a foundation for students wishing to pursue advanced courses in any area of aquatic study.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ENSC 204 - Principles and Practices of Planning
History, theory, methods and processes in regional planning; contemporary issues and professional practices.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Tutorial

ENSC 250 - Introduction to Environmental Data Analysis
This course introduces the principles and practice of developing computer programs to analyze and visualize environmental data. Topics include input and output of data, formatting data, accessing and using package libraries, writing functions, profiling and documenting code, and developing algorithms for environmental data analysis. Example datasets and problems from the geophysical and environmental sciences provide working examples. This course consists of lectures and labs with an emphasis on the development of practical skills in the lab.
Credits: 0.000 OR 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Laboratory

ENSC 302 - Low Carbon Energy Development
This course provides an overview of low carbon energy sources. The course covers global resources, with a focus on energy development in British Columbia. Topics include environmental, economic and social aspects of nuclear, bioenergy, solar, geothermal, wind, hydro, and ocean energy.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

ENSC 303 - Energy Systems and Sustainability
This course provides an overview of where our energy comes from, the services we derive from energy use, such as heat, motion, and light, and the environmental implications of increasing energy demand. Topics include electricity and fuel production, energy demand for buildings, transportation and industry, and the potential of electrification and energy efficiency to reduce energy demand. The course examines future energy scenarios that limit greenhouse gas emissions through both changes in how energy is used and the integration of low-carbon energy sources.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ENSC 307 - Introduction to Geochemistry
This course introduces the fundamental principles of modern geochemistry and biogeochemistry, from the origin of elements to the functions of earth systems. Chemical reactions, the energetics and the physics that control the elemental distributions are explained in the essential reservoirs of earth: rock, water, soils and the atmosphere. Geochemical principles are applied to topics such as climate change, mineral prospecting and envrionmental goechemistry. The course is in alternate years.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ENSC 308 - Northern Contaminated Environments
This course provides students with a broad knowledge base and a sound understanding of various environmental problems in the north, with particular emphasis on practical skills to address such problems. Topics include physical settings of the north; arctic ecology and environmental pollution, pollutant transport pathways in the Arctic, petroleum hydrocarbon pollution in marine and terrestrial environments, air pollution and climate change, industrial waste management, and environmental and human health risk assessment.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ENSC 312 - Biometeorology
This course develops an understanding of the principles of weather and climate at micro-, local and meso- scales. It discusses the processes associated with transfers of heat, mass, and momentum and resulting climates near the surface. Other topics include fog, urban and forest climates, bioclimatology, local winds, as well as transport and dispersion of air pollution.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ENSC 325 - Soil Physical Processes and the Environment
This course focuses on physical principles and processes of soils thta influence organisms and the environment, including retention and movement of water, heat transfer, soil strength, gas exchange, transport of solutes, and soil erosion. Examples from areas of land resource management, environmental quality, agriculture and forestry are used to illustrate principles.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ENSC 404 - Waste Management
This course introduces environmental, technical and political aspects of non-hazardous and hazardous wastes. Topics include source, evaluative methods, risk assessment, treatment, disposal, and current legal and management requirements.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

ENSC 406 - Environmental Modelling
This course provides an understanding of the physical, chemical and biological processes that govern contaminant transport and fate in environmental media. Topics include modelling fundamentals, mass transport in aquatic ecosystems, and mathematical modeling of a wide variety of contamination issues, such as lake eutrophication, river water quality, groundwater contamination, atmospheric deposition, and climate change. Laboratory exercises will complement lecture topics and focus on the development of computer-based modelling skills.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ENSC 408 - Storms
This course covers the analysis and dynamics of synoptic weather systems; cyclones and cyclogenesis; fronts, thunderstorms, jet streams and stability; thermodynamic charts, satellite imagery and weather forecasting. May be taught alternate years.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ENSC 412 - Air Pollution
This is a multidisciplinary course focusing on air pollution: emissions, chemistry, air pollution meteorology and dispersion modelling, engineering and legislative controls, health effects, and airshed planning.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ENSC 418 - Environmental Measurement and Analysis
This is a capstone course for Environmental Science and Environmental Engineering Majors. It is a quantitative laboratory- and field-based course focusing on advanced environmental measurement and analysis of atmospheric, aquatic and terrestrial systems. The approach is integrative and problem-oriented; students may examine natural and/or managed systems, including engineering systems (e.g. waste management) and systems impacted by anthropogenic activity (e.g. contamination).
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ENSC 425 - Climate Change and Global Warming
Climate change and global warming caused by human activity has become one of the most significant environmental, social and economic threats that we have faced. This course presents the science of global climate change and global warming. Emphasis is placed on scientific principles responsible for climate changes, observed evidence of global climate change and global warming, and future climate change. Course topics include climate system, greenhouse effect, El Nino, atmospheric and ocean circulation, Earth's past and present climate, climate models, future climate projection, and climate change impacts on Canada.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

ENSC 430 - Undergraduate Thesis
The undergraduate thesis allows students in Environmental Science or Environmental Engineering to devote time to a concentrated piece of research. The thesis may be completed over one or two semesters.
Credits: 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Undergrad Thesis

ENSC 435 - Soil Biological Processes and the Environment
Processes at the interface between the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere are critical to the regulation of environmental quality on Earth. This course provides an overview of the soil habitat from a biological perspective and of how soil organisms and the processes they mediate play critical roles in a sustainable planet.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ENSC 440 - Internship
May be repeated for credit (maximum six credit hours).
Credits: 2.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Internship

ENSC 450 - Environmental and Geophysical Data Analysis
The focus of this course is on the principles and practicality of the most common environmental and geophysical data analysis methods, including time series analysis and multivariate statistical analysis as well as their application in the environmental and natural sciences. This course consists of lectures and labs, where students apply theories and methods learned in lectures to solve practical problems using computers and software for statistical data analysis.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Laboratory

ENSC 452 - Reclamation & Remediation of Disturbed Environments
This course takes an integrative, scientific approach to the remediation and reclamation of drastically disturbed environments. Industrial activity and chemical spills can result in the contamination of soil, surface water, and groundwater. In addition, some industrial activities such as mining can cause large-scale disturbances to the landscape, potentially impacting both terrestrial and aquatic systems. The focus is on the remediation and reclamation of terrestrial systems, but aquatic systems are also included.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

ENSC 454 - Snow and Ice
This course focuses on the physical processes involving snow and ice that greatly influenced the hydrometerology of Northern British Columbia and the remainder of Canada. This course has the following goals: gaining a better understanding of snowpack, permafrost, lake ice, and glacier formation and ablation processes; learning about the characteristics of snow and ice and how they will evolve with climate change; and conducting an extensive snow survey in the field.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

ENSC 498 - Special Topics
Selected environmental topics. May be repeated for credit (maximum six credit hours).
Credits: 1.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Field Camp

ENSC 499 - Independent Study
May be repeated for credit (maximum six credit hours).
Credits: 1.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed

ENSC 604 - Waste Management
This course introduces environmental, technical and political aspects of non-hazardous and hazardous wastes. Topics include source, evaluative methods, risk assessment, treatment, disposal, and current legal and management requirements.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ENSC 607 - Environmental Modelling
This course provides an understanding of the physical, chemical and biological processes that govern contaminant transport and fate in environmental media. Topics include modelling fundamentals, mass transport in aquatic ecosystems, and mathematical modeling of a wide variety of contamination issues, such as lake eutrophication, river water quality, groundwater contamination, atmospheric deposition, and climate change. Laboratory exercises will complement lecture topics and focus on the development of computer-based modelling skills.
Credits: 0.000 TO 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ENSC 608 - Storms
This course covers the analysis and dynamics of synoptic weather systems; cyclones and cyclogenesis; fronts, thunderstorms, jet streams and stability; thermodynamic charts, satellite imagery and weather forecasting. May be taught alternate years.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ENSC 612 - Air Pollution
A multidisciplinary course focusing on air pollution: emissions, chemistry, air pollution meteorology and dispersion modelling, engineering and legislative controls, health effects, airshed planning.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ENSC 618 - Environmental Measurement and Analysis
This is a quantitative laboratory and field based course focusing on advanced environmental measurement and analysis of atmospheric, aquatic and terrestrial systems. The approach is integrative and problem-oriented; students may examine natural and/or managed systems, including engineered systems (e.g. waste management) and systems impacted by anthropogenic activity (e.g. contamination).
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

ENSC 625 - Climate Change and Global Warming
The climate change and global warming caused by human activity has become one of the most significant environmental, social and economic threats that we have faced. This course presents the science of global climate change and global warming. Emphasis is placed on scientific principles responsible for climate changes, observed evidence of global climate change and global warming, and future climate change. Course topics include climate system, greenhouse effect, El Nino, atmospheric and ocean circulation, Earth's past and present climate, climate models, future climate projection, and climate change impacts on Canada.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ENSC 635 - Soil Biological Processes and the Environment
Processes at the interface between the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere are critical to the regulation of environmental quality on Earth. This course provides an overview of the soil habitat from a biological perspective and of how soil organisms and the processes they mediate play critical roles in a sustainable planet.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

ENSC 650 - Environmental and Geophysical Data Analysis
The focus of this course is on the principles and practicality of the most common environmental and geophysical data analysis methods, including time series analysis and multivariate statistical analysis as well as their application in the environmental and natural sciences. This course consists of lectures and labs, where students apply theories and methods learned in lectures to solve practical problems using computers and software for statistical data analysis.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Laboratory

ENSC 651 - Groundwater Hydrology
This course introduces fundamental principles of groundwater flow and their applications to solve problems related to groundwater resources evaluation, development, and management. Topics include the role of groundwater in geological processes, the occurrence and movement of groundwater, steady-state and transient well hydraulics, aquifer testing techniques, unsaturated flow theory, and groundwater modeling techniques. Supporting computer software may be used.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ENSC 652 - Reclamation & Remediation of Disturbed Environments
This course takes an integrative, scientific approach to the remediation and reclamation of drastically disturbed environments. Industrial activity and chemical spills can result in the contamination of soil, surface water, and groundwater. In addition, some industrial activities such as mining can cause large-scale disturbances to the landscape, potentially impacting both terrestrial and aquatic systems. The focus is on the remediation and reclamation of terrestrial systems, but aquatic systems will be included.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

ENSC 653 - Environmental Resource Management and Decision Making
This course introduces various decision-making models and methods to aid in environmental resources management. Topics include environmental economics, benefit-cost analysis, planning evaluation and review technique (PERT), linear programming, mulit-objective programming, integer programming, stochastic programming, dynamic programming, and nonlinear programming. A number of environmental systems serve as management examples, such as water resources, water quality, air quality, groundwater, solid waste, and forest ecosystem. Supporting computer software may be used.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

ENSC 654 - Snow and Ice
This course focuses on the physical processes involving snow and ice that greatly influenced the hydrometeorology of Northern British Columbia and the remainder of Canada. This course has the following goals: gaining a better understanding of snowpack, permafrost, lake ice, and glacier formation and ablation processes; learning about the characteristics of snow and ice and how they will evolve with climate change; and conducting an extensive snow survey in the field as the basis of a research project and in-class presentation.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video

ENSC 660 - Soil Chemical Processes and the Environment
Reactions at the interface of the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere play key roles in regulating environmental quality on Earth. This course focuses on the key chemical processes in soils, in the Earth’s “Critical Zone.” The fundamental concepts of chemistry and mineralogy are applied to help students understand the soil system and its relevance to processes in natural ecosystems and environments impacted by human activity.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Laboratory


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