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2019 May Semester
Apr 18, 2019
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Information Select the Course Number to get further detail on the course. Select the desired Schedule Type to find available classes for the course.

GEOG 101 - Planet Earth
This course examines pressing global issues such as how 10 billion people will live in a world of finite resources, increasing mobility, and rising inequality. Students learn about core human geography concepts as a means to make sense of humanity’s place in the world. This examination includes the multifaceted ways in which human societies inhabit and transform the Earth’s natural environments, the interconnectedness of places and different ways in which societies respond to widespread challenges.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

GEOG 102 - Earth from Above
This course explores the earth from above, through the eyes of satellites, aircraft, and drones. We have the unique ability to see our planet from different angles and perspectives. When viewed from above, patterns, processes, systems, and human/environmental change on the surface of the planet become highly visible. This course is delivered through lectures and in-class tutorials. Topics include: oceans, rivers, and lakes; landscapes, mountains, and snow and ice; forests and ecosystems; weather and climate; and urban and industrial activity.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

GEOG 111 - Theory and Practice of Physical Geography
This course introduces physical geography students to the theory and practice of physical geography, particularly in BC, through seminars and invited presentations involving professional practitioners in the region and province. A weekend field trip is required. This course is intended for students who want to major in Physical Geography.
Credits: 1.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

GEOG 200 - British Columbia: People and Places
This course provides an introduction to the biophysical and human landscapes of British Columbia with a special emphasis on the relationship of Northern BC to the rest of the province. This course takes a regional approach to understanding the links between the physical geography of the province and its settlement patterns, resource use and economic development.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

GEOG 202 - Resources, Economies, and Sustainability
Natural resources continue to play a vital role in the global economy. British Columbia is a resource-exporting economy within that global marketplace. With a focus on both renewable and non-renewable resources, this course examines economic, community, and environmental issues that complicate debates about development, conservation, and sustainability.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

GEOG 203 - Canada: Places, Cultures and Identities
This course examines Canada’s peoples and diverse environments, emphasizing dynamic identities and relationships. Students consider Indigenous and non-Indigenous identities, immigration to Canada, Canadian cultures, conflicts, symbols, and trends. We focus on patterns of changes in Canada, and future possibilities for Canadian society.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

GEOG 204 - Introduction to GIS for the Social Sciences
To manipulate database and spatial information and to create GIS-based illustrations and maps. This lab-based introductory course will provide a foundation in GIS for Social Scientists. Students will incorporate data searching and acquisition, manipulation of information in spreadsheets, reviewing quality of data, spatial properties of geographic information, linking meta-data to spatial features, basic cartographic techniques and map production.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture, lab, and tutorial components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Tutorial

GEOG 205 - Cartography and Geomatics
This course examines mapping techniques and thematic layers, using GIS software in the labs. Topics include coordinate systems, symbolization, terrain depiction and visualization, aerial photography, satellite images and Global Positioning Systems (GPS). It introduces students to the world of maps and top Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 206 - Social Geography
This course critically examines the ways in which social relations, identities, and inequalities are produced, their spatial variation, and the role of space and place in constructing them. Geographic dimensions of various facets of identity (such as gender, ethnicity, "race," class, sexuality, and ability) and the theoretical frameworks that geographers use to analyze them are emphasized.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Tutorial

GEOG 209 - Migration and Development
Urbanization, globalization, and international migration are dynamic processes changing our social and physical spaces. This course examines global migration processes and the settlement form and organization resulting from migration, refugee movements, and globalization. Analysts and policy makers often overlook the links between migration and its impacts on and potential for development. In this course, we explore these links, recognizing migrant contributions in countries of origin, transit and destination.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

GEOG 210 - Introduction to Earth Science
Discover the nature and formation of Earth's surface, environments, and landforms. Concepts and methods used to understand landscapes, and monitor Earth processes are demonstrated through lectures and labs. Topics include: Earth's surface materials and their interaction with the environment; landforms; weathering; slope movement; and the erosional and depositional effects of gravity, wind, water, waves, and ice.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 211 - Natural Hazards: Human and Environmental Dimensions
With a focus upon natural hazards, this course examines the relationship between human activity and the natural environments in which they occur. The course introduces students to the Earth's physical processes and explores why these processes create risks for people and settlements. Students identify which regions of the world are at greatest risk for a variety of natural hazard types, and how humans can mitigate the loss of life and property.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

GEOG 220 - World Regions: Latin America and the Caribbean
Struggles for land, labour, and resources are central themes in Latin America and the Caribbean. We examine this diverse region as a landscape of inequality with extremes in poverty and wealth dating from the European invasion. Uneven development across time and space is characterized by growing hunger, narco-trafficking, agro-exports, resource extraction, organized crime, undocumented migration, and environmental degradation, as well as resilience and grassroots mobilization for positive change.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

GEOG 222 - World Regions: Russia
This course explores the interaction of physical and human landscapes of Russia. Special attention is paid to nationality issues, energy and other resource developments, the changing state of environmental management, and Russia's shifting geopolitical role in the world.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

GEOG 298 - Special Topics
The course will enable students at the lower division to take courses in topics and areas of special interest based on availability of faculty (including visiting scholars, post-doctoral fellows). The course may be used to enable students still completing their first 60 credit hours of study to participate in selected Geography Field Schools.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

GEOG 300 - Geographic Information Systems
This lab-based course examines the data management and analysis capabilities of GIS, with special emphasis on natural resources and environmental studies. Topics include methods of data input, co-ordinate systems, data sources, attributes, formats and conversion, digital elevation data, raster-vector models, data availability and quality. Lectures introduce two labs per week.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 301 - Cultural Geography
Cultural products, such as music, cuisine, language, and religion, have spatial expressions. Through cultural norms, products and activities, we create places and construct landscapes. This course examines the influence of power relations, cultural imperialism, globalization, and cultural resistances on the human organization of space and on how people engage with place. This is a writing-intensive course, emphasizing improvement of upper-division level written communication through iterative editing.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

GEOG 305 - Political Ecology: Environmental Knowledge and Decision-Making
From the local to the global, we examine geopolitics and power relations of resource use, conservation, environmental knowledge production, policy, and decision-making. Using theory and case studies from geography and political ecology, we investigate access, power, and ownership related to resource use and environmental discourses.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

GEOG 306 - Critical Development Geographies
Using examples from “the local to the global,” this course investigates mainstream and critical international development theory and practice to re-think the ways in which ‘development’ has been understood and to highlight geographical perspectives in formulating new and more critical theoretical understandings. The course focuses on the links between the Global North and South to investigate development theory and practice. We use international case studies to provide context-specific, gender-differentiated information about global inequality, debt, foreign aid, disasters and displacement.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video

GEOG 307 - Changing Arctic: Human and Environmental Systems
Climate change, energy securit, globalization, pollution, and self-determination in the Arctic are major issues that confront both Arctic societies and the world at large. This course examines the cultural, economic, environmental, political and social dimensions of sustainable development in the Circumpolar North through a geographic lens.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

GEOG 308 - Health Geography
This course examines the importance of place individual and collective experiences of health and health care.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

GEOG 310 - Hydrology
This course is an introduction to physical hydrology. It examines the components of the hydrological cycle, and investigates the processes of water movement and storage in the environment.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 311 - Drainage Basin Geomorphology
This course focuses on hillslope and fluvial processes in drainage basins. Laboratory exercises introduce quantitative methods to understand patterns of sediment production, movement, and storage in mountain watersheds.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 312 - Geomorphology of Cold Regions
This course provides a detailed examination of the processes and landforms of cold regions.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

GEOG 320 - Sedimentology
This course considers processes that deposit sediments in Earth's diverse environments that include lakes, rivers, and oceans. At the end of the course students will be able to reconstruct environmental conditions that led to formation of stratified earth materials. Principles of lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, chronostratigraphy, sequence statigraphy, and the facies concept are key topics of the course.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components, if applicable.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Laboratory

GEOG 324 - Community-Based Research
This course provides an intellectual and practical foundation in community-based research approaches. Using a mix of seminar and practical instruction, students will learn about the varieties of collaborative practice involving community-based partners in each stage of research from preliminary negotiations to the presentation of results. The course prepares students for the opportunities and challenges of conducting social science research in the field.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Final Exam, Laboratory, Seminar

GEOG 333 - Geography Field School
Students apply field methods in physical and/or human geography towards an integrated study of local and global environments.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Field Camp, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Tutorial

GEOG 401 - Tenure, Conflict, and Resource Geography
This course examines global resources and their role in questions of conservation and economic development. Emphasis is placed on global and international resource issues and the role of public policy.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video

GEOG 403 - First Nations and Indigenous Geographies
This course analyzes First Nations and Indigenous traditional land tenure systems, colonial processes of land alienation, and Indigenous methods for regaining control over territory, including land claims, co-management, and legal reforms. Case studies are drawn from Canadian and international examples.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

GEOG 405 - Fluvial Geomorphology
This course investigates river channel morphometry and landforms developed by running water and focuses on the physical processes and techniques of measurement. Weekend field trips are required.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 411 - Quaternary and Surficial Geology
This course examines geomorphic processes and environmental change in BC during the last two million years of Earth's history.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 413 - Advanced GIS
A project-oriented course following on from GEOG 300-3 and including topics such as spatial data set construction, data conversion, advanced digital elevation modelling, visualization and integration of raster imagery.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 414 - Weathering Processes
This course provides a detailed investigation of weathering processes and their applied aspects.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Field Camp, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Tutorial

GEOG 420 - Environmental Justice
This course examines environmental injustices in North American and international contexts. We consider cases of environmental racism and responses to injustices (activism; scholarship; policy) related to the following: resource extraction; industrial processes; waste disposal; basic services and quality of life; and tourism.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

GEOG 424 - Northern Communities
Dramatic change and transition are re-shaping rural and small town communities. Drawing examples from northern British Columbia, this advanced seminar course examines a range of economic, social, and community issues, and includes a broad class-based project examining a different northern community each year.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

GEOG 426 - Geographies of Culture, Rights & Power
This seminar examines geographical approaches to culture, rights, and power as they relate to issues of political violence experienced by Indigenous Peoples, labour organizations, and social movements. Primary geographical focus is on the Mesoamerican region, particularily Guatemala, El Salvador, and Chiapas, Mexico. Implications for Canada and the United States are explored through consideration of refugee movements, foreign policy, and grassroots solidarity organizing.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Field Camp, Seminar, World Wide Web

GEOG 430 - Undergraduate Thesis
Student must have completed at least 90 credit hours of study and be a Geography major. The thesis may be taken in one or two semesters in the senior year.
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Undergrad Thesis

GEOG 432 - Remote Sensing
Digital processing of satellite imagery and integration with raster and vector GIS technology in natural resources and remote sensing of the environment. Topics include sensor platforms and data collection, pre-processing, enhancement, classification, change detection, multi-data integration and vectorization.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Tutorial

GEOG 440 - Internship
May be repeated for credit (maximum 6 credit hours).
Credits: 2.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Internship

GEOG 457 - Advanced Remote Sensing
This project-oriented course focuses on advanced classification procedures incorporating digital elevation data, fuzzy and object-oriented classification, and new millenium data sources including ASTER, RADAR, MODIS, LiDAR and high-resolution scenes. Repeat imagery is used to assess local and global changes in land cover, oceanic, atmospheric and/or cryospheric environments.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 498 - Special Topics
May be repeated for credit (maximum 3 credit hours)
Credits: 0.000 TO 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Field Camp, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 499 - Independent Studies
Concentration on a particular topic agreed upon by a member of the faculty and the student (maximum 6 credit hours).
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 601 - Resource Geography
This course examines global resources and their role in questions of conservation and economic development. Emphasis is placed on global and international resource issues and the role of public policy.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

GEOG 602 - Geography of the Circumpolar North
This course examines evolving spatial patterns of human occupancy of the North; social, economic and political dimensions of development in the Circumpolar North in light of physical environment; impacts of internal colonialism; and geographical perspectives on Northern self- determination movements.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

GEOG 603 - First Nations and Indigenous Geographies
This course analyzes First Nations and Indigenous traditional land tenure systems, colonial processes of land alienation, and Indigenous methods used for regaining control over territory, including land claims, co-management, and legal reforms. Case studies are drawn from Canadian and international examples.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

GEOG 605 - Fluvial Geomorphology
This course investigates river channel morphometry and landforms developed by running water, and focuses on the physical processes and techniques of measurement. Weekend field trips are required.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 611 - Quaternary and Surficial Geology
This course examines geomorphic processes and environmental change in BC during the last two million years of Earth's history.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 613 - Advanced GIS
This course covers the use of remote sensing and satellite imagery in GIS: including scene correction, enhancement and time comparison. Advanced GIS and mapping techniques, with concentration on Northern BC will be dealt with.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Graduate, Doctoral
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 614 - Weathering Processes
A detailed investigation of weathering processes and their applied aspects.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 620 - Environmental Justice
This course examines environmental injustices in North American and international contexts. We consider cases of environmental racism and responses to injustices (activism; scholarship; policy) related to the following: resource extraction; industrial processes; waste disposal; basic services and quality of life; and tourism.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

GEOG 624 - Northern Communities
Dramatic change and transition are re-shaping rural and small town communities. Drawing examples from northern British Columbia, this advanced seminar course examines a range of economic, social, and community issues, and includes a broad class-based project examining a different northern community each year.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed

GEOG 626 - Geographies of Culture, Rights & Power
This seminar examines geographical approaches to culture, rights and power as they relate to issues of political violence experienced by indigenous peoples, labour organizations, and social movements. Primary geographical focus is on the Mesoamerican region, particularily Guatemala, El Salvador, and Chiapas, Mexico. Implications for Canada and the United States are explored through refugee movements, foreign policy, and grassroots solidarity organizing.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Field Camp, Seminar

GEOG 632 - Remote Sensing
Digital processing of satellite imagery and integration with raster and vector GIS technology in natural resources and remote sensing of the environment. Topics include sensor platforms and data collection, pre-processing, enhancement, classification, change detection, multi- data integration and vectorisation.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Graduate, Doctoral
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

GEOG 657 - Advanced Remote Sensing
This project-oriented course focuses on advanced classification procedures incorporating digital elevation data, fuzzy and object-oriented classification, and new millennium data sources including ASTER, RADAR, MODIS, LiDAR and high-resolution scenes. Repeat imagery is used to assess local and global changes in land cover, oceanic, atmospheric and/or cryospheric environments. Permission of the instructor required.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory


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