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2019 May Semester
Apr 21, 2019
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INTS 100 - Introduction to Global Studies
This foundation course introduces students to the study of international and global structures, actors, processes, ideas, issues, and events with the aim of understanding and explaining large-scale change in our world. The course is organized around four "great domains" of global studies: environment and sustainability; culture and diversity; politics, security and social justice; and economy and international development.
Credits: 0.000 TO 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Tutorial, World Wide Web

INTS 121 - Beginning Japanese I
This introductory Japanese language course focuses on the four basic linguistic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn typical daily vocabulary and are introduced to Japanese culture through the language. Students learn two phonetic alphabets, hiragana and katakana, as well as approximately 60 kanji (Chinese characters).

This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the Japanese language. It is not open to native speakers. Permission of the instructor is required for students who have completed Grade 10 Japanese or equivalent courses, or who have at least one Japanese speaking parent.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components with the same instructor.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Oral Examination, Tutorial

INTS 122 - Beginning Japanese II
INTS 122-3 is a continuation of INTS 121-3. Students continue to develop their Japanese language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. They are also given a deeper introduction to Japanese culture. This course is more grammar intensive than INTS 121-3, strengthening the foundations set up in that course. Sixty additional kanji are introduced (for a cumulative total of 120).

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 121-3 or obtain permission of the instructor to continue. Permission of the instructor is also required for students who have completed Grade 11 Japanese, or who have prior knowledge of Japanese or who have at least one Japanese speaking parent.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components with the same instructor.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 131 - Beginning Russian I
This introductory Russian language course begins with learning the Cyrillic alphabet and the essentials of Russian grammar, and then focuses on the four basic linguistic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to aspects of Russian culture through the language.

This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of Russian. It is not open to native speakers.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

INTS 132 - Beginning Russian II
INTS 132-3 is a continuation of INTS 131-3. Students increase their proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, while learning more Russian grammar and expanding their vocabulary. Appreciation of Russian culture through language continues.

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 131-3, or obtain permission of instructor to continue. Permission of the instructor is also required for students who have prior knowledge of Russian.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 151 - Beginning Int'l Language I
(International language not regularly offered at UNBC.) An introduction to conversational and written elements of the language using materials from everyday situations.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 152 - Beginning Int'l Language II
Continuation of INTS 151(L)-3.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab separately.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 161 - Beginnning Chinese I
This introductory Mandarin Chinese language course focuses on the four basic linguistic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students practice pronouncing the tones of spoken Mandarin. Students learn typical daily vocabulary, are introduced to Chinese characters, and become acquainted with Chinese culture through the language.

This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the Chinese language. It is not open to native speakers. Permission of the instructor is required for students who have completed Grade 10 Chinese or equivalent courses, or who have at least one Chinese speaking parent.


Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

INTS 162 - Beginning Chinese II
INTS 162-3 is a continuation of INTS 161-3. Students continue to develop their Chinese language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Perfecting pronunciation is emphasized, as well as improving conversational competence (listening and speaking) and learning more Chinese characters.

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 161-3 or obtain permission of the instructor to continue. Permission of the instructor is also required for students who have completed Grade 11 Chinese, or who have prior knowledge of Chinese, or who have at least one Chinese speaking parent.


Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

INTS 171 - Beginning French I
This introductory French language course focuses on the four basic linguistic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Practice of good pronunciation is stressed. Students learn typical daily vocabulary and are introduced to French culture through the language.

This course is designed for student who have no prior knowledge of the French language. It is not open to native speakers. Permission of instructor is required for students who have completed Grade 10 French or equivalent courses.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 172 - Beginning French II
INTS 172 is a continuation of INTS 171. Communication abilities continue to be emphasized, along with application of grammatical rules in short compositions. Students acquire a deeper knowledge of the French culture.

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 171, or obtain permission of instructor to continue. Permission of instructor is required for students who have completed grade 11 French, or some French immersion education.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 181 - Beginning Spanish I
This introductory Spanish language course focuses on the four basic linguistic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are also introduced to Spanish culture through the language.

This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the Spanish language. It is not open to native speakers. Permission of the instructor is required for students who have prior knowledge of Spanish or who have completed Grade 10 Spanish or equivalent courses.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Laboratory, Oral Examination
All Sections for this Course

INTS 182 - Beginning Spanish II
INTS 182 is a continuation of INTS 181. This course introduces more complex grammatical structures, along with a broader vocabulary. Students also explore cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world.

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 181, or obtain permission of instructor to continue. Permission of instructor is also required for students who have prior knowledge of Spanish.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 200 - Contemporary Russia
This is an interdisciplinary survey of modern Russia and its peoples.The course explores the geographical, environmental, historical, social, economic, political, and cultural features of the country.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Field Camp, World Wide Web

INTS 203 - Contemporary Japan
This is an interdisciplinary survey of Japan and its people. The course explores the geographical, environmental, historical, social, economic, political, and cultural features of the country.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 204 - Contemporary China
This is an interdisciplinary survey of China and its peoples. The course explores the geographical, environmental, historical, social, economic, political, and cultural features of the country.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 207 - Contemporary Latin America
This interdisciplinary survey of the Latin American region and its peoples explores the geographical, envirnonmental, historical, social, economic, political, and cultural features of the countries that make up the region.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 210 - Globalizations
Globalization is a defining phenomenon of our time. This course is a survey of interdisciplinary perspectives on the processes, actors, and dynamics of globalization.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 220 - Global Economic Shifts
This course examines the shifting spatial dynamics of the world economy. Trends in global production, trade and investment over the past 200 years are analyzed and the reasons for these shifts discussed. Contemporary dimensions of globalization are identified with a focus on examining the rise and re-emergence of new global powers such as Brazil, Russia, India and China.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 221 - Intermediate Japanese I
INTS 221-3 is a continuation of INTS 122-3. This course is designed to enhance students’ functional skills in the Japanese language and to deepen their knowledge of Japanese culture. Students learn to communicate and express themselves more effectively and with greater confidence on familiar topics. In addition, this course begins to emphasize writing in Japanese. Sixty additional kanji are introduced (for a cumulative total of 180).

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 122-3, or obtain permission of the instructor to continue. Permission of the instructor is also required for students who have prior knowledge of Japanese or who have at least one Japanese speaking parent.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 222 - Intermediate Japanese II

INTS 222-3 is a continuation of INTS 221-3. Students continue to acquire and deepen their undertstanding of Japanese language and culture through the further development of listening, speaking, and reading skills. In addition, this course continues to emphasize writing, encouraging students to develop their own style. Sixty additional kanji are introduced (for a cumulative total of 240).

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 221-3 or obtain permission of the instructor to continue. Permission of the instructor is also required for students who have completed Grade 12 Japanese or who have a least one Japanese speaking parent.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 225 - Global Environmental Challenge: Sustainability
Global environmental sustainability is one of the monumental challenges of our modern world. In this course, students tackle two central questions: What is (global-to-local) environmental sustainability? How can we achieve it? A problem-solving approach is emphasized, especially regarding the interaction between science and public policy. Sustainability issues are investigated theoretically and through specific case studies.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 231 - Intermediate Russian I
INTS 231-3 is a continuation of INTS 132-3. Students continue their study of grammar and improve their functional skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Course exercises are designed to deepen knowledge of Russian culture.

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 132-3 or obtain permission of the instructor to continue. Permission of the instructor is also required for students who have prior knowledge of Russian.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

INTS 232 - Intermediate Russian II
INTS 232-3 is a continuation of INTS 231-3. Students complete their study of Russian grammar and further develop their listening, speaking, reading, and writing abilities. In addition, they continue to pursue a deeper understanding of Russian culture.

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 231-3 or obtain permission of instructor to continue. Permission of the instructor is also required for students who have prior knowledge of Russian.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

INTS 240 - Contemporary Circumpolar North
This is an interdisciplinary survey of the Circumpolar North and its peoples. The course explores the geographical, environmental, historical, social, economic, political, and cultural features of the countries that make up the region.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

INTS 251 - Intermediate International Language I
The development of speaking, writing and reading abilities using modern texts.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Oral Examination, Tutorial

INTS 252 - Intermediate International Language II
Continuation of INTS 251(L)-3.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and lab components.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 261 - Intermediate Chinese I
INTS 261-3 is a continuation of INTS 162-3. This course is designed to enhance the students' linguistic skills, and to deepen their knowledge of Chinese culture. Simple Chinese proverbs are idiomatic expressions are introduced.

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 162-3 or obtain permission of the instructor to continue. Permission of instructor is also required for students who have prior knowledge of Chinese or who have at least one Chinese speaking parent.


Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

INTS 262 - Intermediate Chinese II
INTS 262-3 is a continuation of INTS 261-3. Students continue to deepen their understanding of Chinese language and culture through the further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, including short essay writing.

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 261-3 or obtain permission of the instructor to continue. Permission of the instructor is also required for students who have completed Grade 12 Chinese or who have a least one Chinese speaking parent.


Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

INTS 271 - Intermediate French I
INTS 271-3 is a continuation of INTS 172-3. Instruction is conducted primarily in French. Students enhance their functional skills in the French language. This course is appropriate for student with prior exposure to French who want to refresh and expand their language skills. Appreciation of French culture through the language continues.

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 172-3, or obtain permission of instructor to continue. Permission of instructor is required for students who have had French immersion eduation and those who have completed Grade 12 French.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 272 - Intermediate French II
INTS 272-3 is a continuation of INTS 271-3. Students acquire the skills to express themselves in debate and discussion on a wide variety of topics and aspects of French culture. Elements of French literature are also introduced. This course is conducted in French, and is appropriate for students who have recently completed their Grade 12 French. It also provides French Immersion students an opportunity to review their grammar.

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must meet a minimum grade of C in INTS 271-3, or obtain permission of instructor to continue. Permission of instructor is also required for students who have had French immersion education.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 281 - Intermediate Spanish I
INTS 281-3 is a continuation of INTS 182-3. This course reviews and expands on the essential points of grammar covered in the first year, while introducing new concepts that enhance the proper use of the language. Students deepen their insights into the history, culture, and literature of the Spanish world.

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 182-3, or obtain permssion of instructor to continue. Permission of instructor is also required for students who have prior knowlege of Spanish or who have completed Grade 11 or 12 Spanish.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 282 - Intermediate Spanish II
INTS 282-3 is a continuation of INTS 281-3. Students acquire a deeper understanding of the Spanish language and culture through further development of skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are encouraged to participate in discussions, debates, and interactive presentations to develop their communication skills.

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C in INTS 281-3, or obtain permission of instructor to continue. Permission of instructor is also required for students who have prior knowledge of Spanish or who have completed Grade 12 Spanish.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 298 - Special Topics in Global Studies
This course is a detailed examination and analysis of contemporary issues in global studies. It is designed to address timely topics in a rapidly changing world. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours if the material is substantially different. To register in subsequent distinct course offerings in excess of 6 credit hours, permission of the Program Chair is required.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

INTS 300 - International Organization
How is our world organized and governed? This course is an investigation of the actors, dynamics, and processes of global governance, including the United Nations, other intergovernmental institutions, non-governmental organizations and private actors.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

INTS 301 - International Law
International law is a defining feature of our contemporary gloabl society. This course explores the nature and sources of international law and its application to the establishment of order in global society.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 302 - Canadian Foreign Policy
What is Canada's foreign policy and how is it made? This course surveys the institutions, actors, processes, and issues that determine Canadian foreign policy, including a review of the relationship of foreign policy to domestic policies.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 304 - International Development
International development is critical to global well-being but is a complex and contested process. This course examines approaches to and problems of economic, social and political development from a global perspective. The role of the state, international development institutions, and global civil society are explored.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

INTS 306 - Human Rights
"All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights" (Article 1 of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948). This course examines human rights issues and problems from a global perspective, including environmental, cultural, social, political, civil, and economic rights. The roles of international institutions and transnational advocacy networks in promoting and enforcing human rights are explored.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

INTS 307 - Global Resources
How do humans use the Earth's endowment of natural resources? How can we best conserve them? This course examines the interaction between the global political economy and natural resources. Debates about resource scarcity/abundance, environmental and social concerns related to production and consumption, and inter-state and intra-societal competition for access to resources are explored.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 308 - Gender and International Studies
Understanding gender is essential for understanding how our world thinks and functions. This course offers a critical analysis of the role of gender in global affairs.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 309 - Global Science and Technology
Science and technology permeate our lives, local to global. This course is an inquiry into their role in an era of globalization. The origins of science and technology and their "merger" in the late 1800s provide the foundation for an analysis of their relationship to present-day environmental, cultural, social, political, and economic issues at the international and global levels.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 310 - Origins and Evolution of Our Globalizing World
Cultivating a sense of 'deep history' is essential to understanding our global present and global future. This course analyzes the historical origins and evolution of constituent elements of our modern world: global structures (such as the nation-state system), agents (such as multinational corporations), processes (such as war), ideas (such as liberalism), and issues (such as environmental degradation). It then casts an eye to their future. The focus of the course is the dynamics of large-scale change. Also covered is the origin of the field of Global Studies.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 321 - Japanese Conversation and Composition I
INTS 321-3 is a continuation of INTS 222-3. Students begin to acquire advanced skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in order to communicate effectively and sensitively in a variety of social contexts. Students are expected to actively participate in discussions and interactive presentations, and to write in a variety of styles. Sixty additional kanji are introduced (for a cumulative total of 300).

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must meet a minimum grade of C in INTS 222-3 or obtain permission of the instructor to continue. Permission of the instructor is also required for students who have prior knowledge of Japanese or who have at least one Japanese speaking parent.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Oral Examination

INTS 322 - Japanese Conversation and Compostion II
INTS 322-3 is a continuation of INTS 321-3. This course is designed to further develop and reinforce the practical use of the Japanese language in different social contexts by facilitating the development of conversational fluency and various writing skills. Students learn an additional 60 kanji (for a cumulative total of 360).

This course is not open to native speakers. Students must meet a minimum grade of C in INTS 321-3 or obtain permission of the instructor to continue. Permission of the instructor is also required for students who have prior knowledge of Japanese or who have a least one Japanese speaking parent.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Oral Examination, Tutorial

INTS 325 - Film and Global Society
This course is an exploration of our globalizing world through the medium of film.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Tutorial, World Wide Web

INTS 340 - The Circumpolar North in Global Perspective
Canada is part of the Circumpolar North; UNBC is a school "in the north, for the north". This course examines the North from a global perspective. The North was once considered remote and pristine. Today it is at the center of sovereignty, security, energy, development, and indigenous issues. These issues are surveyed, as are attempts to create a more integrated circumpolar society.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

INTS 360 - Global Sports
Sports have gone global. This course tell you how and why. It surveys the role of sports in mass global culture, including an examination of professional sports and mega-sporting events such as the Olympics and the FIFA World Cup.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 377 - Redefining Security
What is security? This course reviews the evolution of the notion of security from traditional definitions associated with the military and the state to more recent definitions of (human) security which include gender, economics, and the environment.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 378 - Intelligence and Security
Intelligence-gathering is a significant, and in the case of spying, covert aspect of global society. This course is a comparative analysis of the place of security and intelligence in global affairs. The role of the four major elements of intelligence (collection, counterintelligence, analysis and estimates, and covert action) are examined as are the oversight and control issues raised by these activities.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 402 - Pacific Affairs
This seminar explores contemporary issues and relations between Asia and Pacific peoples, cultures, and states.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 407 - Global Economy and Development
This course is an analysis of the evolution of the global economy, and an assessment of competing theories of the global economy. The prospects for developing countries within the global economy are examined.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 410 - Environment and Development in the Circumpolar North
Examination of conservation and development issues and experiences in the northern circumpolar countries.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

INTS 420 - International Regimes
Broadly known as norms, principles, rules, and decision-making procedures that prescribe and proscribe certain types of behaviour, international regimes or institutions are seen as fundamental bases on which many international actors do what they do. This course investigates the shifts that have occurred in international institutions and the predominance of international (or global governance) normative arrangements in areas such as human rights, human security, finance, trade, development, environment, and resource extraction.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Seminar

INTS 421 - The Political Economy of Natural Resource Extraction
This course examines the political economy/ecology of natural resource extraction by examining issues such as the socio-economic, political, human and environmental dimensions of extractive activities. Specific global case studies are used to explore the concepts of sustainable livelihoods, vulnerability and adaptation, community well-being and governance at both domestic and global levels.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Seminar

INTS 440 - Internship
Internship
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Internship

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

INTS 460 - Issues in Canadian Foreign Relations
This course is a detailed examination of selected problems in Canada's foreign relations.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 470 - Global Environmental Governance
This seminar analyzes the monumental challenge of globally governing the human relationship with the natural world, often referred to as global environmental governance or Earth System governance.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

INTS 490 - Global Capstone
This course is required for all Global and International Studies majors in their final year before graduation. Students will engage in research projects that express their cumulative learning in global studies.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 498 - Special Topics in Global Studies
This course is a detailed examination of contemporary issues in global studies. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours if the material is substantially different. To register in subsequent distinct course offerings in excess of 6 credit hours, permission of the Program Chair is required.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

INTS 499 - Independent Study
Independent Studies
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

INTS 620 - International Regimes
Broadly known as norms, principles, rules, and decision-making procedures that prescribe and proscribe certain types of behaviour, international regimes or institutions are seen as fundamental bases on which many international actors do what they do. This course investigates the shifts that have occurred in international institutions and the predominance of international (or global governance) normative arrangements in areas such as human rights, human security, finance, trade, development, environment, and resource extraction.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Seminar

INTS 621 - The Political Economy of Natural Resource Extraction
This course examines the political economy/ecology of natural resource extraction by examining issues such as the socio-economic, political, human and environmental dimensions of extractive activities. Specific global case studies are used to explore the concepts of sustainable livelihoods, vulnerability and adaptation, community well-being and governance at both domestic and global levels.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Seminar

INTS 640 - Environment and Development in the Circumpolar North
Examination of conservation and development issues and experiences in the northern circumpolar countries.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, World Wide Web

INTS 650 - Pacific Affairs
A detailed study of contemporary issues in the relations between Asia-Pacific nations, including an assessment of regional and subregional institutions.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 660 - Issues in Canadian Foreign Policy
A detailed examination of selected problems in Canada's foreign relations.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 663 - Canadian-American Relations
A review of the evolution of relations between Canada and the United States.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 664 - Canada and the Americas
An examination of issues and problems in Canada's relationship with the countries of North, Central and South America.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

INTS 670 - International Environmental Policy
International Environmental Policy. This seminar considers international actions dealing with environmental problems such as climate change, ozone depletion, hazardous waste, POP's, war and the environment, fresh water quality, deforestation, biodiversity, and endangered species. Discussion focuses on the ways and the extent to which these problems can be met by international agreements and governance arrangements, or on what International Studies calls environmental "regimes". Two basic questions will be addressed: what factors facilitate the formation of international environmental regimes; and can these regimes be effective while overcoming the "tragedy of the commons"?
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

INTS 698 - Special Topics in International Studies
This course offers a detailed examination and analysis of a contemporary issue in international studies, including the exploration of future policy options.
Credits: 3.000 OR 6.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Final Exam, Seminar, World Wide Web

INTS 699 - Independent Study
This course enables students to read in depth in an area of international studies not normally covered by existing courses in the program. Permission of the graduate advisor and consent of the faculty supervisor are required.
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

INTS 700 - Research Methods in Global Studies
This course is a graduate seminar on quantitative and qualitative methods of in Global Studies. Theoretical, methodological and practical issues in undertaking research from a global perspective are examined.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Seminar

INTS 701 - State of the Discipline
A graduate seminar in which students prepare and present a series of papers concerning theoretical, methodological and instuctional issues in International Studies.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Seminar

INTS 702 - Graduate Colloquia
Students attend colloquia on a range of research conducted on global issues. Students must register twice in this course. The course is offered during the September and January semesters. This course is PASS/FAIL.
Credits: 0.500

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Seminar

INTS 797 - Research Paper
This course involves the student (or students) working with a supervisor to prepare a document for submission for publication. The topic and form of publication are decided by the supervisor and the student(s).
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Seminar

INTS 799 - Graduate Thesis
MA Thesis
Credits: 12.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Masters Thesis


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Release: 8.7.2