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2019 September Semester
Jul 16, 2019
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Information Select the Course Number to get further detail on the course. Select the desired Schedule Type to find available classes for the course.

NRES 100 - Communications in Natural Resources and Environmental Studies
This course will provide a basic understanding of human behavioural responses as well as develop learning skills in oral and written communications. Emphasis will be on determining the nature of an audience, accessing appropriate material, report writing, oral presentation and literature relevant to natural resources and environmental disciplines.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Tutorial

NRES 421 - Professional Writing
This course provides a structured environment in which students learn and apply professional report writing. Topics include development of a research question or problem statement, accessing and properly citing information and references, synthesis and organization of information, report structure and formatting.
Credits: 1.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, World Wide Web

NRES 422 - Undergraduate Report
This course enables students to develop a professional report under the supervision of a faculty member. Students work independently, but are provided guidance on a one-on-one basis by the faculty member. The professional report requires definition of a problem statement or research question, and synthesis and integration of information from a multitude of sources.
Credits: 2.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed

NRES 430 - Undergraduate Thesis
An undergraduate thesis offers students substantial research experience, which may be helpful for proceeding to postgraduate studies. The course requirements include conducting supervised research, writing a thesis, and presenting the results orally. Students taking this course would normally be majoring in Biology, Environmental Studies, Natural Resources Management (Forest Ecology and Management, Outdoor Recreation and Conservation, or Wildlife and Fisheries), or Nature-Based Tourism Management. NRES 430 is normally taken over two semesters and requires that a student find an Undergraduate Thesis research supervisor. Students are encouraged to apply to potential supervisors well in advance of completing 90 credit hours.
Credits: 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Undergrad Thesis

NRES 498 - Special Topics in Natural Resources and Environmental Studies
This course covers selected topics related to Natural Resources and Environmental Studies. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours if the material is substantially different.
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

NRES 698 - Special Topics in Natural Resources and Environmental Studies
This course covers selected topics related to Natural Resources and Environmental Studies. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours if the material is substantially different.
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Field Camp

NRES 700 - Research in Natural Resources and Environmental Studies
This course exposes Master’s students to various philosophies and epistemologies regarding research within the field of natural resources and environmental studies. Topics include the nature of research, communicating research, research ethics, qualitative and quantitative methodology and interdisciplinary research.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Audio/Video

NRES 701 - Graduate Colloquia
Students attend weekly colloquia on a range of research conducted in natural resources and environmental studies. Students must register twice in this course. The course is offered during the September and January semesters. This is a PASS/FAIL course.
Credits: 0.500

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Audio/Video, Seminar, World Wide Web

NRES 703 - Integrated Resource Management
A critical examination of the concepts, policies, and methods for integrating multiple uses of resource values into management of forest and rangeland ecosystems.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed

NRES 710 - Modeling and Simulation
This course enables students to use models to represent and analyze quantitative aspects of natural systems (static, dynamic, and spatial). The course involves use of analytical, physical, and/or numerical models such as computational fluid dynamics models to simulate natural systems. Visualization, validation, verification, and sensitivity analysis of models are discussed.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

NRES 712 - Spatial and Temporal Analyses
This course exposes students to analyses associated with the spatial and temporal dynamics of ecological systems. Emphasis is on recognizing and understanding inherent challenges of these approaches rather than statistical theory. Topics may include identification of temporal and spatial patterns, issues of inference and statistical tests associated with spatial and temporal analyses, and applications of remote sensing and GIS to environmental monitoring and natural resource management.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

NRES 720 - Global Change
This integrative course deals with physical, chemical, biological and social dimensions of human influence on global conditions such as greenhouse gases, desertification, ozone depletion and eutrophication. Global element cycles are used to provide integration. Impacts of global change on people, communities and economies, and adaptation to or mitigation of global change are discussed.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

NRES 730 - Disturbance Ecology
This course covers the effects of biotic and abiotic disturbance agents on ecological processes in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Topics covered may include the role of disturbance frequency, scale and pattern in vegetation and animal succession, animal and plant adaptation and dependance on disturbance, and effects of anthropogenic disturbances or management of disturbance events on ecosystem function. The course may include a field study of a selected system, e.g., sub-boreal forest or prairie landscape.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video

NRES 732 - Forest Systems and Management
This course covers the important processes and features of forest systems, with special emphasis on sub-boreal, boreal, and riparian systems. Processes such as tree and forest gas and nutrient exchange, tree growth and aquisition of resources, and the effects and interactions of management practices, pathogens, arthropods, vertebrates, and climate change on forest systems are examined. The course requires each student to complete a 'forest systems' laboratory or field research project with a UNBC faculty member.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed

NRES 733 - Plant-Animal Interactions
This course examines the contribution of plant and animal interactions to ecosystem variability and stability. Examples include a range of taxa from invertebrates through large mammals, living in systems that have coevolved versus those that have not. Topics may include plant defenses to herbivory, use of stable isotopes to define food webs, and the applicability of using predator-prey models to describe plant-animal interactions.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed

NRES 737 - Evolutionary Biology
This course is an examination of evolutionary processes, including discussions of micro- and macro-evolutionary change and the underlying behavioural, ecological, physiological, biochemical and genetic variation among individuals upon which evolution can act. Topics vary with the instructor, and may include: molecular evolution, concepts and mechanism of speciation, adaptions that affect the evolution of organisms, or factors limiting their exploitation of different environments.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed

NRES 760 - Field School in Human Ecology
This field-school is an intensive, interdisciplinary course addressing themes including social-ecological systems, human-environment relationships and ecosystem approaches to health. The course includes class-based sessions and intensive field-based components relevant to the course theme and location, that differ from year to year. The field-school brings together colleagues in natural sciences, health sciences, social sciences, humanities, and beyond, who work in collaboration with interested parties and community members to address issues at the interface of environment, society and health.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate, Doctoral
Schedule Types: Field Camp, Seminar, Field Studies

NRES 761 - Graduate Field Applications in Resource Management
This field-based course, normally offered in conjunction with NREM 333-3, provides graduate students with a practical understanding of principles of integrated resource management. The course focuses on the many values of a landbase through modularized lessons and an authentic case study approach. Meeting with various stakeholders and professionals working in the field allows students to explore relevant and contemporary issues in natural resource management.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Field Camp, Seminar

NRES 762 - Graduate Biology Field School
This is a graduate level experiential course designed for students to focus on theoretical and practical skills involved in the field. It is normally offered in conjunction with BIOL 333-3 Biology Field School. Each field school is designed to incorporate the theories, models and other concepts introduced in the classroom and bring them into greater clarity by examining them in a real world setting. This course may be repeated with the permission of the instructor if the subject matter and course location differ substantially.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Field Camp, Seminar

NRES 763 - Graduate Geography Field School
Graduate students apply field methods in physical and/or human geography towards an integrated study of local and global environments. This course is normally taught concurrently with GEOG 333-3.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Field Camp

NRES 770 - Rural and Small Town Geography
This course integrates social science research on rural and small town change within the context of northern communities. Issues may include work, housing, gender, ethnicity, social services provision, community conflict, and quality of life. The course emphasizes case study research within theoretical frameworks, and draws especially upon examples from northern British Columbia.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed

NRES 771 - Law and the Geographies of Justice
This course explores the relations between power, justice, law, and the construction of place. Students gain an understanding of geographic approaches to rights issues in a variety of contexts (depending upon instructor and student interests). The key concepts of legal geography, cultural geography, indigenous rights, globalization, culture, social justice, international law, and customary law are examined.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed

NRES 773 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methodology
This seminar course explores methodological approaches to, and theoretical frameworks of, qualitative research. Emphasis is given to exploring key concepts of validity, rigour, reliability, subjectivity/objectivity, and ethics of concern to qualitative researchers. The course surveys various frameworks including indigenous, feminist, and critical methodologies, among others, to understand their assumptions and approaches to fieldwork including interviewing, survey work, field notes, writing results, and reciprocity. This course explores how to translate abstract concepts such as place, space, scale, region, and mobility into viable field methods.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Seminar

NRES 774 - Dimensions of Outdoor Recreation and Nature-Based Tourism
This course integrates ecological and social science approaches to the study of outdoor recreation, nature-based tourism and protected areas. The course emphasizes the latest quantitative and qualitative theoretical research and its applicability to recreation and tourism and draws upon examples from British Columbia, Canada and the world.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

NRES 775 - Society and Natural Resources
This graduate seminar course explores different aspects of the relationship between society and natural resource development. The themes explored vary depending on student interests and instructor areas of expertise, but typically involve consideration of the following: social processes by which natural resources are defined and valued; how these processes change over time and space; how conflicting and contradictory values and understandings of natural resources are resolved; and the social processes by which natural resource development is managed. Themes may include considerations of gender, culture, place, economics and governance.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Seminar

NRES 776 - Advanced Statistical Analyses for Natural Resource Sciences
This course provides graduate students in natural resource sciences with advanced, practical training in the analysis of quantitative data. The course focuses primarily on advanced univariate statistics that can be applied to both experimental and observational data. This focus includes a full exploration of generalized linear models (E.g., linear, logistic, and mixed models) as well as methods for experimental data including analysis of variance and associated techniques. Also, students receive instruction in the principles of experimental design, data management, and the review and reporting of statistical results. Students receive instruction in the use of statistical software used for manipulating and analysing data that are applicable to the natural resource sciences.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate course in univariate statistical analysis or permission of the Instructor


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Laboratory
All Sections for this Course

NRES 790 - Master of Science (NRES) Thesis
The MSc thesis results in a scientific contribution to a traditional science field or to an applied understanding of resources and the environment. It requires that a student undertake original research involving a literature review and the development of a research design and methodology appropriate to the research problem. The implementation of the research methodology will normally include original investigation and data collection, the analysis and discussion of which will constitute the major part of the completed research thesis. The thesis may involve, but is not confined to, the testing of a specific hypothesis or hypotheses. Required for graduation in the Master of Science (Natural Resources and Environmental Studies stream).
Credits: 12.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Masters Thesis

NRES 792 - Master of Natural Resources & Environmental Studies Thesis
The MNRES thesis addresses an integrated research problem. It requires that a student undertake original research involving a literature review and the development of a research design and methodology appropriate to the research problem. Implementation of the research methodology will normally include original investigation and data collection, the analysis and discussion of which will constitute the major part of the completed research thesis. The thesis may involve, but is not confined to, the testing of specific hypothesis or hypotheses. Required for graduation in the Master of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies Thesis option.
Credits: 12.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Masters Thesis

NRES 793 - Master of Natural Resouces and Environmental Studies Project
The MNRES project is an extended position paper, report, plan or program that addresses a major problem or issue relevant to the field of natural resources and environmental studies. The project development requires the application of original thought to the problem or issue under investigation, and the framing of that problem within the broader context of natural resources and the environment. The project does not require the development of a research design or research methodology, and need not involve the collection of original data. Students are required to pass an evaluation of the project set by the supervisory committee as this course is required for graduation in the Master of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies project option.
Credits: 6.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Masters Project

NRES 794 - Master of Arts (NRES) Thesis
The MA thesis contributes to the understanding of social, political, economic, and/or cultural dimensions of natural resources and the environment. It requires that a student undertake original research involving a literature review and the development of a research design and methodology appropriate to the research problem. The implementation of the research methodology will normally include original investigation and data collection, the analysis and discussion of which will constitute the major part of the completed research thesis. The thesis may involve, but is not confined to, the testing of a specific hypothesis or hypotheses. Required for graduation in the Master of Arts (Natural Resource and Environmental Studies).
Credits: 12.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Masters Thesis

NRES 798 - Special Topics
This course is intended to fulfill requirements for specialized instruction in any of the disciplines represented in the Faculty of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies. Topics will be chosen depending upon student interest and instructor availability, and topic headings will vary from year to year and from section to section. Note: Students may take this course more than once under different topic headings.
Credits: 0.000 TO 3.000

Levels: Graduate, Doctoral
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Field Camp, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Tutorial

NRES 799 - Independent Study
This course provides a concentration on a particular topic or topics agreed upon by the student and a member of the faculty in the NRES Graduate Program. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours, if the material is substantially different.
Credits: 1.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Graduate, Doctoral
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

NRES 801 - Integrated Environmental Systems I
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the biological, chemical, and physical processes of ecosystems. Key sciences to be considered include biology, ecology, physics, chemistry, earth sciences, selected social sciences, and recent developments in systems theory, as well as interactions among the sciences. This course will involve a critical examination of the nature and distribution of components within ecosystems, the processes that govern them, and their relevance to environmental systems. Major issues in natural resource management and environmental studies, such as global climate change, will provide the discussion framework for this class.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Doctoral
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

NRES 802 - Integrated Environmental Systems II
This course exposes the student to the major extant theoretical explanations of human use, valuation, appreciation, and perceptions of the natural environment. Included will be overviews of the role of science in society, market and non-market valuation processes with respect to natural resources, attitude formation, aesthetics and perceptual bases, planning and policy implications, and the driving forces in human uses of natural resources. An important component will be an exploration of the major natural resource issues involving environmental ethics and reasoning.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Doctoral
Schedule Types: Lecture

NRES 803 - Integrated Environmental Systems III
Students in the graduate cohort work together to formulate an interdisciplinary perspective on their graduate research projects. Supervisors and the supervisory committees guide students in the development of their research proposals, while the NRES 803-3 cohort and instructor provide input, through seminars and discussions, to help the student relate the research thesis to the social and arts, physical, and life sciences of natural resources and the environment.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Doctoral
Schedule Types: Lecture

NRES 804 - Graduate Seminar
This seminar is geared towards developing "critical thought" and aims to help candidates respond across a broad spectrum of topics. The seminar functions to generate debate on various (frequently contentious) issues, to promote interaction with faculty members and other students across the entire faculty, and to act as a platform for presentations by the students themselves and invited speakers. Each PhD student is expected to give two 50 minute presentations. One presentation will be on a topic agreed upon by the student and the course co-ordinator, and the other will be relative to the student's thesis.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Doctoral
Schedule Types: Final Exam, Seminar

NRES 890 - Thesis Research
A doctoral thesis must stress original research or an original investigation, interpretation or synthesis of existing research.
Credits: 12.000

Levels: Doctoral
Schedule Types: Doctoral Thesis

NRES 899 - Independent Research
This course allows a student to conduct non-thesis research on topics under the supervision of a member of the faculty in the NRES Graduate Program. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 3 credit hours, if the material is substantially different.
Credits: 1.000 TO 3.000

Levels: Doctoral
Schedule Types: Self-Directed


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