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2024 September Semester
Apr 18, 2024
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POLS 100 - Contemporary Political Issues
An introduction to the basic concepts of political science through an examination of contemporary political issues: local, provincial, national and international.

Please note: You must register separately in lecture and tutorial components if applicable.


Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory, Tutorial, World Wide Web

POLS 200 - Canadian Government and Politics
How Canadians organize their joint efforts to govern themselves at local, provincial, and federal levels. Attention is directed towards the political culture and its realization in constitutional rules of the game, in different institutions, and in the varied ways of influencing what governments do.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Tutorial, World Wide Web

POLS 202 - Canada in Comparative Perspective
This course compares the political, economic and social development of Canada with that of other industrial democracies and with that of developing and transitional countries throughout the world. The course focuses on several themes including democratic development and institutional growth; the role of government in society; citizen participation and engagement; and regional politics.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

POLS 230 - International Relations
This course is an introduction to classical and contemporary theories of international relations as a traditional sub-discipline of political science. These theories are explained using historical and modern examples of politics at the international level.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

POLS 255 - Introduction to Law in Canada
This course is an introduction to the Canadian legal system and the practice of law in Canada. Topics include an overview of the legislative and judicial processes as well as a survey of the major areas of law. The course also introduces students to the role of the lawyer within the legal system.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

POLS 257 - Public Law in Canada
Public law includes the areas of law regulating the internal operations of governments and state agencies, the interactions among orders or levels of government and the interactions between state and non-state actors. Subjects covered in this course include constitutional law, administrative law, human rights law and criminal law and procedures.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

POLS 258 - Private Law in Canada
Private law refers in general to the areas of law that regulate the interactions among non-state actors including citizens, corporations and non-state agencies. The course covers such areas as property law, torts, contracts, family law and commercial law in Canada.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

POLS 270 - Political Philosophy: Antiquity to Early Modernity
This course is a survey of political philosophy from the Greeks to the 15th century tracing the development of contending conceptions of political order in the context of philosophical ideas of the time.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

POLS 290 - Research and Writing for Political Science
This course provides training in essential research and writing skills in political science. Students learn how to complete research papers in the discipline and thereby develop advanced reading and writing skills for their future careers. Students are expected to complete this course in their first or second year of study.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

POLS 298 - Special Topics in Political Science
The content of this course varies according to the instructor and student requests. With permission of the chair, this course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours if the material is substantially different.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Field Camp

POLS 302 - How Government Works
This course enables students to navigate the political and bureaucratic structures and processes that shape our lives on a daily basis. It also provides students with practical skills to pursue careers in government at the local, provincial and federal levels.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

POLS 303 - Democracy and Democratization
This course examines the theoretical and institutional foundations of democracy, the causes and consequences of democratization and democratic decay, and the complex relationship between democracy and human development.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

POLS 305 - American Politics and Society
This course introduces students to American politics and society, focusing on the organizational and historical development of the American political system as well as the contemporary challenges facing the United States of America.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

POLS 309 - Chinese Politics and Society
This course introduces students to Chinese politics and society, examining Chinese political and social development with a primary focus on comparing past and present in areas such as state building, economic development, and social change.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

POLS 311 - Russian Politics and Society
This course introduces students to Russian politics and society, focusing on the organization and historical development of the Russian political system as well as the contemporary challenges facing the Russian Federation.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

POLS 314 - European Politics and Society
This course introduces students to European politics and society, focusing on the historical development and political structure of the European Union as well as the contemporary challenges facing Europe.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

POLS 315 - Contemporary Issues in the Circumpolar World
This course provides opportunities for students to gain an in-depth understanding of a variety of issues in the Canadian and circumpolar Arctic, including governance and politics, Indigenous peoples and self-government, education, the environment and resource development, gender, health, and Arctic security and sovereignty.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, World Wide Web

POLS 316 - Municipal Government and Politics
This course surveys approaches to the study of municipal government with special attention to citizen participation, and administrative efficiency in municipal politics.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

POLS 320 - Canadian Politics and Policy
The course provides an introduction to the concepts, goals and methods of policy analysis, with applications to current policy issues in Canada, British Columbia and the North. Topics include public opinion surveys and the statistical analysis of policy preferences.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

POLS 321 - The Charter of Rights and Freedoms in Canada
This course examines the development of Canada’s Constitutional Charter of Rights and Freedoms and how its entrenchment and invocation have changed the political opportunity structure in Canada. The Charter has been controversial since it was first proposed and debated and continues to be a source of controversy. At the same time, the Charter has become increasingly significant in the way social movements organize, frame, and pursue their claims for social change. This course considers the politics of Indigenous rights, group rights and social movements under the Charter. Students also explore how the Charter of Rights and Freedoms has changed democracy in Canada and whether this change has been for the better.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Final Exam, Seminar

POLS 327 - Leadership and Ethics in Local Government
This course examines the principles and practices of ethical leadership with a particular focus on local government.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

POLS 332 - Community Development
How can communities develop politically, economically and socially, in ways that serve their needs and are appropriate to their environment, culture and expectations? The nature and interpretations of community development will be explored, using experiences from Canada, the Circumpolar North and the Asia-Pacific region.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

POLS 333 - Politics and Government of BC
This course surveys the many faces and challenges of BC politics, with specific attention to political culture and parties, the political economy, government and administration, and contemporary issues.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

POLS 344 - Society, Policy and Administration of Natural Resources
This course on natural resource and environmental management explores the ways in which ideas and interests are articulated and conflicts are resolved within the policy process.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

POLS 350 - Law and Municipal Government
This course is an examination of the legislation, regulations and court decisions relevant to municipal governments in British Columbia.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

POLS 351 - Local Services and Public Policy
This course examines local government services and the challenges involved in their delivery to local communities. Topics include public works, protective services, refuse collection, recreation and cultural services, health and social services and environmental protection.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

POLS 353 - Project Management in Local Government
This course teaches students how to plan, implement and manage projects in and for municipal and local governments. Students are taught how to design project plans and how to bring complex projects to fruition. Skills learned by students include scheduling, budgeting, communication, personnel management and the management of change.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

POLS 360 - Local Government Finance
This course examines budgeting with a particular focus on local government. Topics include assessment, taxation collection, the development of local budgets, provincial and federal government transfers, and long-term financial planning.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

POLS 370 - Political Philosophy: Early Modernity to Post-Modernity
This course traces the history of Western political thought, in the wider context of the history of philosophy, from early modernity to the early twentieth century. Thinkers discussed may include Aquinas, Ockham, Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Schopenhauer, Rousseau, Fichte, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche and Heidegger.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

POLS 372 - Theories of Justice
This course introduces students to the study of justice in contemporary political theory and practice. Specific topics include justice in the liberal and libertarian traditions, justice as impartiality, justice and the politics of difference, justice as a universal or culturally bound norm, reconciliation and transitional justice, and questions surrounding historic injustice and its contemporary redress. Case studies from Canada and around the globe are used to highlight the challenges associated with implementing the requirements of justice in concrete political settings.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

POLS 377 - Politics of Climate Change
This course introduces students to some of the most intractable political obstacles impeding efforts to address the global climate emergency, and investigates creative political strategies for navigating those obstacles at the local, national, and global levels. Topics include the domestic drivers of national climate change policies; realpolitik and national self interest in international climate negotiations; inequality and the burdens of climate change adaptation; climate politics as a source of conflict and partisan polarization; and the political psychology of climate passivity and climate change denial.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

POLS 380 - Law and Indigenous Peoples
This course provides a critical introduction to the constitutional law of Indigenous rights and its impact on the distribution of power, resources, and jurisdictional space amongst Indigenous, federal, and provincial governments in Canada. Topics include the evolution of the Supreme Court of Canada’s section 35 Aboriginal rights jurisprudence, Indigenous legal traditions, law and the politics of reconciliation, Indigenous resistance and direct action, the impact of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and the British Columbia Treaty Process.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

POLS 403 - Social and Health Policy and Administration
This course examines the evolution of social and health services in Canada in a comparative context. This includes the provision of public services, federal-provincial relations and the development of community health and social services.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, World Wide Web

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

POLS 405 - Special Topics in Political Science
This course is an analysis of the challenges of political, economic and social transition. The content of this course varies according to the instructor and student requests. With permission of the chair, this course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours if the material is substantially different.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

POLS 413 - Democracy and Diversity
This course is an exploration of the politics of ethnic, racial and religious diversity and its impact on the theory and practice of democracy in the 21st Century. Theoretical concepts and models are examines in relation to case studies drawn from Canada and around the globe.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

POLS 414 - Comparative Federalism
This seminar course examines the theories, concepts and issues that influence politics and policy-making in federal countries around the world.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

POLS 415 - Comparative Northern Development
This seminar course examines the strategies and challenges of northern development in Canada, Russia and other parts of the Arctic region.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

POLS 416 - Gender and Politics
This course examines gender, understood as a hierarchical, binary opposition of masculinity and femininity, and its intersection with power relations, understood as an expression of politics. The course examines how gender hierarchy is a system of differential power that intersects with various systems of oppression and privilege. A significant amount of time is spent on the topic of intersectionality in politics from a variety of standpoints within our ever-changing socio-economic context, including Indigenous feminisms, eco-politics, Black social movements, disability, LGBTQ movements, and various iterations of masculinity.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Final Exam, Seminar

POLS 422 - Ethnographic Research Project
This course gives students the experience of a field school in which they study selected aspects of politics, cultures and peoples in order to design and carry out a major research project. Course materials vary depending on the location of the field school and on the general research topic. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours.
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Field Camp

POLS 427 - Ethics and Public Affairs
This course is an exploration of the ethical foundations of domestic and foreign policy making in contemporary democratic states. Special emphasis is placed on the tension that frequently arises between moral idealism and political realism in the conduct of public affairs.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

POLS 434 - Resource Communities in Transition
An examination of issues facing rural, remote and northern resource communities across Canada. It compares issues from across Canada's provincial norths as well as has a specific focus on northern British Columbia. Issues discussed include, among other things, the economic realities of globalization, the issues of identity for resource communities, and the issue of urban policy decision processes on rural, remote and northern regions.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, World Wide Web

POLS 440 - Internship I
An internship allows students to receive credit while gaining practical experience in a professional workplace under the guidance of a workplace supervisor and a UNBC instructor. Students with proposals for an internship should consult the Department Chair well in advance.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Internship

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

POLS 441 - Internship II
This course allows students to continue an internship begun in POLS 440-3 or to begin a new internship. Students with proposals for a continuation or for a new internship should consult the Department Chair well in advance.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Internship

POLS 472 - Seminar in Political Philosophy
This seminar guides students through the process of conducting a research project in political philosophy. Topics are chosen according to students’ interests. With permission of the Chair, this course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours if the material is substantially different.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

POLS 480 - Law and Politics in the Arctic
This course focuses on legal and political issues in the Arctic, including relevant areas of international law, comparative constitutional law, political science and international relations. Topics may include sovereignty, resources, the environment, geo-political trends, human rights including Indigenous peoples’ rights, governance, international cooperation, security, diplomacy and globalization.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Final Exam, Seminar

POLS 498 - Special Topics in Political Science
The content of this course varies according to the instructor and the needs of the students. This course may be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credit hours with permission from the Department Chair.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Field Camp, World Wide Web

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

POLS 499 - Independent Study
The content of this course varies according to the instructor and the needs of students. With permission of the chair, this course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours if the material is substantially different.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Field Camp

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

POLS 603 - Social and Health Policy in the Context of Health and Health Care
This course examines the evolution of social and health services in Canada in a comparative context and encourages students to think broadly about health care, taking into account the social, political, cultural, historical and economic factors that affect health and health policy. Students critically examine the impact of global, national, provincial and local influences on the delivery of health care and on the enactment of advanced practice. Students use concepts of public policy and policy analysis to analyze policies that are relevant to professional practice and health care and to be equipped to engage in policy debates and to influence health policy.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

POLS 605 - Topics in Society and Democracy
This course is an analysis of the challenges of political, economic and social transition. With permission of the chair, this course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours if the material is substantially different.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

POLS 613 - Democracy and Diversity
This course is an exploration of the politics of ethnic, racial and religious diversity and its impact on the theory and practice of democracy in the 21st Century. Theoretical concepts and models are examined in relation to case studies drawn from Canada and around the globe.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

POLS 614 - Comparative Federalism
A comparative examination of the theories, development, and problems of federalism in countries such as Russia, Canada, Germany, United States, Australia and Switzerland.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

POLS 615 - Comparative Northern Development
An examination of the strategies and challenges of northern development, including political administration, resource development, the environment and indigenous peoples in Russia, Scandinavia, Alaska and Canada.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video

POLS 616 - Gender and Politics
This advanced course examines gender, understood as a hierarchical, binary opposition of masculinity and femininity, and its intersection with power relations, understood as an expression of politics. The course examines how gender hierarchy is a system of differential power that intersects with various systems of oppression and privilege. A significant amount of time is spent on the topic of intersectionality in politics from a variety of standpoints within our ever-changing socio-economic context, including Indigenous feminisms, ecopolitics, Black social movements, disability, LGBTQ movements, and various iterations of masculinity.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Final Exam, Seminar

POLS 627 - Ethics and Public Affairs
This course is an exploration of the ethical foundations of domestic and foreign policy making in contemporary democratic states. Special emphasis is placed on the tension that frequently arises between moral idealism and political realism in the conduct of public affairs.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

POLS 672 - Seminar in Political Philosophy
This seminar guides students through the process of conducting a research project in political philosophy. Topics are chosen according to students’ interests. With permission of the chair, this course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours if the material is substantially different.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

POLS 680 - Law and Politics in the Arctic
This course focuses on legal and political issues in the Arctic, including relevant areas of international law, comparative constitutional law, political science and international relations. Topics may include sovereignty, resources, the environment, geo-political trends, human rights including Indigenous peoples’ rights, governance, international cooperation, security, diplomacy and globalization.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Final Exam, Seminar

POLS 698 - Special Topics in Political Science
This course provides students with in-depth knowledge of a specialized topic in political science. With permission of the chair, this course may be repeated for credit if the subject matter is substantially different.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Field Camp

POLS 702 - Scope and Methods of Political Science
A graduate seminar which examines major considerations in doing quantitative and qualitative methods of social research and explores critical, theoretical, and other methodology issues in the discipline.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed

POLS 704 - Independent Study
The content of this course is determined on a case-by-case basis. With permission of the chair, this course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours if the material is substantially different.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed, Field Camp

POLS 795 - Major Research Paper
This course is intended for students in the Political Science Master's degree program who have chosen the course-based option. The content of the course is determined by the student's graduate supervisor, who oversees the student's research and grades the final paper. It is normally the final course in the student's program of studies.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Masters Project

POLS 797 - Graduate Project
The Graduate Project is a requirement for students choosing the MA Project Option. Students will prepare a 12,000 - 15,000 word research paper, under the direction of a supervisor from Political Science. The project will contain a thorough review of the existing literature, a detailed bibliography, and will demonstrate clear evidence of critical thinking. A project proposal, and the final research paper, will be assessed by a graduate committee, comprising the supervisor, one other member from Political Science, and one member from outside the program. This is a PASS/FAIL course.
Credits: 9.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Masters Project

POLS 799 - Master's Thesis
The MA thesis should pose and attempt to deal with a significant public question in a way that demonstrates critical thinking, an understanding of the relevant literature, and the ability to conduct systematic research. This should be accomplished within the limits of 20,000 - 25,000 words. In preparation for the thesis, a research proposal is to be drafted (in consultation with the faculty) and submitted for discussion and approval to a committee of three persons appointed by the Program Chair. This is a PASS/FAIL course.
Credits: 12.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Masters Thesis


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