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2019 May Semester
Apr 18, 2019
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SOCW 200 - Introduction to Social Work Practice
This course provides an overview of Social Work practive including the historical, political, philosophical and practical bases in Canadian Society. It introduces students to the values, concepts, and relevant Social Work Codes of Ethics. There is also an overview of current social problems and related fields of practice.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

SOCW 201 - Introduction to Social Welfare
Introduces students to the welfare state in Canadian society. It examines historical, ideological and contemporary issues in the Canadian welfare state and reviews some of the major programs, policies and concerns confronting policy makers, social workers and client groups.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

SOCW 300 - Social Work Communication Skills
Communication Skills in Social Work Practice is an introductory course that aims to increase skills and analysis in the diverse cultural settings that are appropriate to social work among First Nations and remote, northern and rural communities. Learning to recognize the contradictions in people's experiences and to maximize the possibilities, resources and strengths in their lives are critical aspects of a social worker's practice. Emphasis on integration of interpersonal and analytic skills in learning effective helping strategies within a stuctural framework that acknowledges the influence of class, race and gender in shaping personal and social well-being. This course includes a Skills Laboratory.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 301 - Critical Social Work Practice
This course critically examines the historical origins, values, methods and applications of various social work practice approaches. With an emphasis on structural, feminist, and First Nations social work strategies, the focus includes the application of these approaches to women, minority groups, First Nations, and residents of northern and remote communities. These will be contrasted with other models of social work practice including general systems theory, ecological theory, and case management.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 302 - Social Work Field Education I
An initial three-day per week field placement, which includes a bi-weekly integrative seminar, is required of all students. Students are involved in a wide range of practice roles and responsibilities at the individual, family, group and community levels. The course provides an initial opportunity for students to link social work concepts and theory with practice skills. It also introduces students to the structure, goals and operation of different human service agencies. Field practice objectives and details are worked out among the student, the agency supervisor and the faculty field instructor.
Credits: 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Tutorial

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 310 - First Nations Social Work Issues
This course examines methods of developing an antiracist social work practice in the context of First Nations experience. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding emerging models and structures within First Nations communities. The development of these models is explored within a context of analyzing the impact of the colonial experience. Students are introduced to alternative methods including some of the healing stategies and organizational structures in First Nations communities.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

SOCW 320 - Critical Social Policy
This course examines the development of social policy in Canada, including current debates from conventional and critical perspectives inviting students to consider the relationship between research, policy and social work practice. The course will review ideologies of social welfare policy, its formulation and implementation and consequences for people in need. Policy formulation will be analyzed from a critical perspective that examines the role of power and privilege in the constuction of social policy. Alternative social arrangements and models of policy and practice will be explored.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 330 - Social Work Research/Policy/Practice
Social Work Research, Policy and Practice introduces research methods and analysis techniques that are used to examine issues in the policy and practice of social work and social welfare. It reviews qualitative and quantitative approaches with an emphasis on community needs research, participatory research and the development of interview schedules and questionnaires. The methods examined in this course will be linked to substantive policy and practice issues that reflect the economic, social and personal circumstances of people and communities in northern, remote and First Nations communities.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 336 - Social Work Philosophy and Ethics
This course critically asesses the ethical issues involved in carrying out the tasks of Social Work practice, policy and research. Using the relevant Social Work Codes of Ethics as a starting point, these practice, policy and research roles are considered in the context of northern and remote Social Work. The course reviews different theoretical approaches to Social Work.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

SOCW 401 - Northern/Remote Social Work Practice
Northern and Remote Social Work Practice builds on the structural approach examined in SOCW 301-3. Critical generalist practice will be examined within the context of current and emerging client populations and practice issues. The course aims to develop a critical awareness/analysis of the nature, cause and response of social workers to the social problems they are meant to deal with in the field of practice aspects of their work in northern and remote communities.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

SOCW 402 - Social Work Field Education II
This field placement requires students to perform in a social work role or organizational setting five days per week throughout the term. Field education provides undergraduate students with an opportunity to enhance and refine their social work skills. As much as possible, the assigned field education setting will broadly match the particular type of social work experience that the student wishes to pursue. The course includes three one-day seminars as part of the field education placement.
Credits: 15.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Practicum, Seminar, World Wide Web

SOCW 420 - Family/Child Welfare Policy
Family and Child Welfare Policy focuses particularly on feminist and First Nations critiques of child welfare policy and social work intervention. It critically examines assumptions in family and child welfare policy including notions of family, substitute care, conceptions about violence and neglect, and the implications of child and welfare policy for social work practice in northern communities.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

SOCW 421 - Human Growth and Development
This course examines human growth and development with an emphasis on social processes from birth to death. The course follows a life cycle approach and addresses the influence of issues such as culture, class, gender and sexual orientation. Linkages are drawn between individual human development and health and social welfare policy, particularly as it affects residents of northern British Columbia. Note: Students who have not taken a human growth and development course must take this course prior to graduating with a BSW. If students have previously taken a Human Growth and Development course, they must check with a Student Advisor to ensure that the course meets the Human Growth and Development requirement.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

SOCW 422 - Child Welfare Practice
This course examines child maltreatment from the perspective of social work practice in the field of child welfare. The course looks at various forms of child maltreatment including methods of assessing maltreatment and the cultural and structural factors that must be considered in assessing issues such as risk. Intervention strategies are also examined along with the legal procedures and responsibilities carried by the child welfare social workers.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

SOCW 424 - Child Welf/Sites of Resistance
Sites of Resistance: Race, Poverty and Sexuality in the Fields of Child Welfare focuses on contemporary child welfare policy and practice from the standpoints of racial and sexual minorities as well as from those on the economic margins of contemporary capitalist/patriarchal society.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

SOCW 426 - Current Issues in Child Welfare Practice
This course highlights topical child welfare issues and current trends in child welfare practice, examines different methods of intervention and attempts to link changes in the economic circumstances of families to the social well-being and healthy family functioning.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 432 - Unemployment and Social Work
Unemployment, Social Welfare and Social Work Practice examines the implications of unemployment and under-employment for social work practice and policy within a provincial, national and global context. In particular, the course will focus on the reframing of unemployment as a social work issue, explore the social consequences of joblessness, and identify models of policy and practice which are applicable in different environments: northern, rural, urban and single industry communities. Alternative policies will be explored.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 433 - Women in the Human Services
From a feminist and structural social work perspective, this course examines a range of women's issues in terms of socialization, work, health, sexuality, power and the state, legal issues and the impact these have on the roles and positions of women in Canadian society, and in particular within human and social services.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 435 - Community Social Policy
This course represents a community practice project geared to integrating Social Work theory, policy, research and practice with specific community issues. Students prepare public briefs on actual areas of community concern in the light of Social Work and welfare theory, policy and practice. The brief focuses on proposed forms of action and the implementation of the strategies of change and intervention.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 437 - Social Work with Groups and Communities
This course examines the historical evolution of group work and the role that Social Work has played within this context. Different types of group approaches and experiences are discussed, including professionally led groups and self-help groups. Students consider the operation of groups through analysis of group norms, roles, values, goals and decision making from a perspective that is both theoretical and experiential.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 438 - Comparative Welfare Analysis
This course provides a critical introduction to Canadian and comparative social policy as it relates to evolving issues in Social Work practice. Its main theme is to show how the welfare systems of individual countries can only be understood through exploring the wider international context. Particular attention is paid to the interactions between family policies and issues of race and gender, and to the processes by which individuals or groups are given or denied access to full welfare citizenship. Topics include principles of comparative studies, models of welfare, convergence versus divergence, the dynamics of welfare-state development, welfare regime analysis, crisis of the welfare states, and the impact of welfare states.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam

SOCW 439 - Social Work/Law and the Justice System
This course examines various areas of the Canadian legal system; constitutional documents and conventions, the court system, the provincial legislative powers, rights of Aboriginal Peoples, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and provincial legislation (such as Adoption Act; Child, Family and Community Service Act; Child, Youth and Family Advocacy Act, Family Relations Act, etc.). It also examines the practice of Social Work in court settings. Specifically, it provides a basic understanding of the rights and interests of children, rules of evidence, and the role of various interveners. Court writing skills will be introduced and court visits will be arranged.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 440 - Social Work in Mental Health
This course examines policy and practice issues pertaining to the understanding and delivery of Social Work services to people with a psychiatric disability. Although the content explores many ideas that are international and national in scope, the primary focus is on the policies and practices that are relevant to people in Northern British Columbia. Students examine assessment and intervention methods as well as analyze the impact of current trends and changes in the health and social welfare system as they pertain to people who require mental health services. The nature and impact of psychiatric disability are viewed from both an individual level as well as a structural level of analysis. The major emphasis is on practice and policy issues relating to people who are described as "psychiatric survivors".
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Audio/Video

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 441 - Social Work and Substance Abuse
Social Work and Substance Abuse examines alcohol and other drugs in terms of their effects on individuals, families and society. It also looks at different roles of social workers and human service workers in helping people deal with and understand alcohol and drug abuse.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 442 - Social Work with Victims of Abuse
Social Work with Victims of Abuse examines physical, emotional, and sexual abuse and violence perpetrated on less powerful individuals. The roles played by the helping professions in this context are also examined.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 443 - Medical Social Work
Focuses on the knowledge, attitudes and skills workers need to practice effectively in health care settings. Case studies will be used to demonstrate different methods of intervention in this context.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 444 - Social Work Critical Issues in Aging
Critical Issues in Aging, Social Work Practice and Research examines the physical, social and psychological needs of the elderly. Adaptation of generic social work skills in effective intervention with and on behalf of the aged is also examined.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 445 - Social Work and Cross-Cultural Practice
Social Work and Cross-Cultural Practice provides interdisciplinary approaches to understanding cultural and visible minority groups in relation to society and differential access to power are examined. The course will examine and critically evaluate different methods of assistance and intervention offered by social work to minority groups.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 448 - Inequality and Income Security
Poverty, Inequality and Income Security examines the changing landscape of Canadian social policy and its implications for poverty, income inequality and income security. It reviews the evolution and devolution of major Canadian income security policies with a special focus on British Columbia. The implications of these changes on poverty and income inequality are examined for the people that live and work in northern British Columbia. This is done by looking at changes in poverty and income inequality for specific groups that include single mothers, First Nations, women, men, the unemployed and underemployed, the elderly, and those dependent on public assistance.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 449 - Gender and Sexuality
This course critically examines constructions of gender and sexuality that include cross-cultural and class analyses. It also focuses on the historical character of sexual relations and gender and begins to challenge what is taken for granted in contemporary society specifically as these notions affect social work policy and practice.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 450 - Social Work and Family Practice
Social Work and Family Practice through the application of family systems theory, will examine current approaches to working with families in community counselling settings. Completion of a family assessment, as well as a critical examination of power dynamics in families, and their connection with the larger society will be undertaken. Issues of gender, race, age, class, sexual preference, and so on will be analyzed in this context.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 452 - Social Work/Crisis Intervention
Crisis Intervention in Social Work examines the historical development of crisis intervention practice and theory. Several models of crisis intervention are presented with an analysis of their application to particular areas and fields of social work practice. Included in the fields of practice are suicide assessment and intervention, child abuse, spousal assault, physical illness and disability, psychiatric emergency and grief resolution. Analysis and discussion will centre around crisis intervention as it applies to social work practice with minority groups in northern communities. In addition to lecture and discussion material, interview and process skills will be practised in this course.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Tutorial

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 453 - Social Work Practice and Spirituality
This course provides a forum for the critical exploration of the impact and influence of religious thought and practices on human service work. The historical roots of this work are based in religious movements, aspects of which still affect today's practice/ policy. In an increasingly multicultural environment, students must have a fundamental understanding of religion and spirituality in order to practice effectively.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

Course Attributes:
Upper Division Course

SOCW 454 - Disability Issues
This course involves students in an examination of perspectives on disability, as well as critical analysis of current theories, policies, and practice. The course begins with an examination of common assumptions about disability and provides opportunities to challenge and critique interpretation of the nature and meaning of disability.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

SOCW 455 - First Nations Governance and Social Policy
Family values and standards of First Nations form the basis of the study on First Nations policy development and its relationship to self-governance for First Nations communities. Topics explored include self-determination from a First Nations perspective, its impact on Canadian Social Policy, along with the necessity to address Child and Family social needs into self-governance and planning. The course focuses on examples within British Columbia communities. Additionally, the course explores the importance of how social work practitioners need to become skilled advocates aimed at influencing policy and laws affecting First Nations and family systems.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

SOCW 456 - Family Caring Systems
This course develops an understanding of family caring systems from an Aboriginal/First Nations perspective. Topics explored include Aboriginal/First Nations world views, traditional roles of family members, the role that historical events have played in the development and current social realities of First Nations and the role that social workers can play in family wellness. Contemporary Social Work practices with Aboriginal/First Nations children and families are also analyzed and critically reflected upon, with a particular emphasis on directions in Aboriginal/First Nations child and family welfare.
Credits: 0.000 OR 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

SOCW 457 - Individual & Community Wellness
This course develops an understanding of the role that wellness plays in the life of Aboriginal/First Nations individuals and communities. Topics explored include the definition of healing and wellness, the role that historical events have played in the development and current socio-economic situation of First Nations and the role that social workers can play in the future development of health and wellness of First Nations individuals and communities. As well, the issue of self-care and self-management for First Nations people and the social workers who may work in high stress situations is explored.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

SOCW 497 - Reflection on Practice
This course is designed for students who are, or plan to be, working in a child welfare setting. The objective is to provide an opportunity to reflect on practice experience. The historical and cultural development of social work practice models is surveyed emphasizing contemporary models such as anti-oppressive practice, constructivism and feminist practice. Assessment, intervention planning, advocacy, organizing, recording, confidentiality, evaluation, case management, interdisciplinary and termination are also studied.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Final Exam, World Wide Web

SOCW 498 - Special Topics
Special topics courses may be offered from time to time. These courses are available to permit faculty to offer courses in areas that fall within their particular areas of research and expertise in Social Work practice and policy. With permission of the Chair of the Social Work Program, students may repeat the course for credit.
Credits: 3.000 TO 6.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

SOCW 499 - Directed Readings
Students can undertake a directed reading course in order to fulfill a particular learning need and area of interest. Directed readings are dependent upon the availability of faculty resources.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Self-Directed

SOCW 600 - Social Work and Community Data Analysis
This course uses the Social Administration framework of the MSW program. Students will be introduced to existing data bases and will be taught a wide range of computer applications and software packages that are particularly useful in community-based social work practice, policy and advocacy in northern regions and communities. This course extends throughout the MSW year and will also integrate qualitative and participatory research approaches.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

SOCW 601 - Issues in Northern/Remote Social Work
Current Issues in Northern and Remote Social Work Policy and Practice unravels, explores and analyzes the linkages between community issues, personal presenting problems and global, national and regional historical, economic and social developments. It focuses on public issues and personal problems as they affect different demographic groups and First Nations populations that live in the central and interior of British Columbia. This course aims to formulate changes in social work practice and policy that give a greater voice to the comsumers of welfare and the social and personal services of the welfare state.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Audio/Video

SOCW 602 - First Nations: Adv Social Work Practice
First Nations: Advanced Social Work Practice investigates conceptual, policy and practice issues that will help professionals in the human services develop an appropriate role for social work in indigenous cultures. Government and legal processes, values, economic factors, policies and practices will be examined. Issues such as racism, the position of women and children in relation to reserve, town and city life, autonomy, integration, underdevelopment and the transfer of social services to First Nations will be addressed.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

SOCW 603 - Women: Policy/Practice Issues
Women and Human Services: Critical Issues in Policy and Practice explores the historical nature of the role of women and women's struggles in Canada with particular focus on the role of women in northern, remote and First Nation communities. The exploration also includes a review of feminist perspectives and the meaning and application of feminist practice for social work in the areas of policy, research, counselling and direct service. The course draws on interdisciplinary knowledge and will provide the opportunity to analyze and debate the social and political forces which have shaped the condition of women in social work in particular and in human services generally. While gender relations are the focus, they will be analyzed as they intersect with race, class, ability, sexual orientation, aging, and so on.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Audio/Video

SOCW 604 - Directed Reading/Electives
Directed Readings enables students to undertake an independent reading course in an area that fits a chosen MSW research/policy/practice concentration. Students may take a maximum of one Directed Readings course.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed

SOCW 605 - Community Work/Politics of Change
Community Work and the Politics of Change is based on theories of social change and interactive problem solving skills with groups and communities is the main focus of this course. Critical analysis of selected field experiences will be examined in relation to the values of participatory democracy, co-operation, empowerment, mutual aid and social justice vision of genuine community. Issues to be examined include developing grass roots leadership, valuing undervalued persons and building a community culture of hope. The methods of popular education, participatory action research and other forms of qualitative research directed to the politics of change will be examined.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, World Wide Web

SOCW 609 - Advanced Quantitative Research
Advanced Quantitative Research in Social Policy and Social Work Practice covers a range of quantitative methods, research designs, statistical analyses and measures. The course explores social policy and social work issues in comparative, national and provincial contexts and links measures, methods and analyses to current issues and debates in social work policy and practice. The course prepares students with the research tools necessary to undertake their thesis and/or practicum project. MSW Foundation Year students must successfully complete SOCW 634-3 prior to registration.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

SOCW 610 - Wellness: Alternate Approaches
This course introduces and explores a variety of techniques in expressive arts, movement and process-oriented therapeutic approaches in working with individuals, couples, families and groups. Themes and exercises focus on addictive behaviours, mental health and wellness. Exercises are interwoven throughout the course. These incorporate the materials taught and provide students with the opportunity to practice the different techniques examined in this course.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

SOCW 613 - Clinical Social Work Practice
Critical analysis of psychotherapy and counselling, particularly by women and ethnic/racial minorities has had an influence on how pyschotherapy is organized and how values are expressed. Psychotherapy and counselling have also been influenced by the reality of restructuring in health care, education and social services. Social workers have been faced with the challenge of delivering service in environments that are increasingly restrictive. These developments have encouraged the implementation of new therapeutic approaches which emphasize brevity, respect for clients, client strength and collaborative approaches to problem solving. This course explores clinical practice within this context with emphasis on issues that pertain to northern British Columbia. The course requires critical analysis as well as practice skills.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Audio/Video

SOCW 614 - Social Work/Postmodern Debates
Social Work and the Postmodern Debates surrounding postmodernity are contesting prevailing value systems and dominant ideologies of western society. The politics of postmodernism have been taken up in the social sciences and humanities; how they are affecting social work discourse, policy and practice will be the focus of this course.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

SOCW 615 - Multi-Cultural Social Work Practice
Social Work Practice In a Multi-Cultural Context is to prepare students for work with various ethnic and racial minority clientele. Topics include: the impact of formal and informal social policies and institutions on the well-being of minorities; the relationship between cultural norms and social work practice. Opportunities for experiential learning in the classroom and community settings allow students to interact with selected cultural groups.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, World Wide Web

SOCW 620 - Policy Making/Human Services Policy
Policy Making and Human Service Administration will examine the formation and impact of social policy in a variety of areas (such as the pension debate, unemployment insurance reforms, criminal law reform, reform welfare reform and the personal social services). Socio-political, economic and international forces shaping policy-making will be identified. It will provide students with an opportunity to apply classic and current organization theory to social services administration. The areas under examination include: current problems and issues in social service administration; the impact of hierarchical and bureaucratic structures on social work practice with an emphasis on state social work; and the impetus for organizational changes. Theory and research on the role of the professional worker within the state sector, case materials and students' practice experience will form the basis for discussion.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, World Wide Web

SOCW 621 - Comparitive Welfare Analysis
Comparative Social Welfare analysis provides a critical introduction to comparative social policy. Its main theme is to show how the welfare systems of individual countries can only be understood through exploring the wider international context. Particular attention is paid to the interactions between family policies and issues of race and gender, and to the processes by which individuals or groups are given or denied access to full welfare citizenship. Topics include: principles of comparative studies; models of welfare; welfare convergence versus divergence; welfare regime analysis; crisis of the welfare states; and the impact of welfare states.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

SOCW 622 - Hunger/WElfare/Food Security
Hunger, Food Security and Social Policy will examine the issue of hunger and food insecurity in Canada and other advanced industrial societies and will explore competing approaches to achieving food security in terms of the politics of welfare in local, national and international contexts. Topics will include: issues in the definition and measurement of hunger; social and economic consequences; responses of the state and civil society including the role of food banks and non-government organizations; food security as a human rights issue and the role of domestic and international legislation; and the contribution of the health, welfare, education, environment, agriculture and food policy sectors in achieving food security.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

SOCW 630 - Communication Skills
This course is an introductory course that aims to increase skills and analysis in the diverse cultural settings that are appropriate to social work among First Nations and remote, northern and rural communities. Learning to recognize the contradictions in people's experiences and to maximize the possibilities, resources and strengths in their lives are critical aspects of a social worker's practice. Emphasis on integration of interpersonal and analytic skills in learning effective helping strategies within a structural framework that acknowledges the influence of class, race and gender in shaping personal and social well-being. This course includes a Skills Laboratory.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video, Lec/Lab/Tut Combination, Laboratory

SOCW 631 - Critical Social Work Practice
This course critically examines the historical origins, values, methods and applications of various social work practice approaches. with an emphasis on structural, feminist, and First Nations social work strategies, the focus includes the application of these approaches to women, minority groups, First Nations, and residents of northern and remote communities. These will be contrasted with the other models of social work practice including general systems theory, ecological theory, and case management.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Audio/Video

SOCW 632 - MSW Practicum I
This field placement introduces MSW students who do not have a BSW to the social work role and organizational settings. The field placement consists of 450 hours and provides students with an opportunity to enhance and refine their generalist social work skills. The focus of the placement is on the development of generalist skills, however, where possible, students are matched to a placement that broadly meets their area of interest.
Credits: 9.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Practicum

SOCW 633 - Critical Social Policy
This course examines the development of social policy in Canada, including current debates from conventional and critical perspectives inviting students to consider the relationship between research, policy and social work practice. The course will review ideologies of social welfare policy, its formulation and implementation and consequences for people in need. Policy formulation will be analyzed from a critical perspective that examines the role of power and privilege in the construction of social policy. Alternative social arrangements and models of policy and practice will be explored.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Audio/Video

SOCW 634 - Social Work Research/Policy/Practice
This course introduces research methods and analysis techniques that are used to examine issues in the policy and practice of social work and social welfare. It reviews qualitative and quantitative approaches with an emphasis on community needs research, participatory research and the development of interview schedules and questionnaires. The methods examined in this course will be linked to substantive policy and practice issues that reflect the economic, social and personal circumstances of people and communities in northern, remote and First Nation communities
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, Audio/Video

SOCW 635 - Social Work Philosophy & Ethics
This course critically assesses the ethical issues involved in carrying out the tasks of social work practice, policy and research. Using the Social Work Code of Ethics as a starting point, these practice, policy and research roles are considered in the context of northern and remote social work. The course reviews different theoretical approaches to social work.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam, World Wide Web

SOCW 637 - Advanced Practice
This course is designed for graduate students who have worked in social work practice settings but who do not have formal social work training. This historical and cultural development of social work practice models is surveyed with emphasis on contemporary models of practice such as anti-oppressive practice, constructivism, feminist practice such as assessment, intervention planning, advocacy, organizing, recording, confidentiality, evaluation, case management, interdisciplinary and termination are studied.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Final Exam

SOCW 640 - Social Work Supervision and Leadership
This course examines leadership and supervision from a social work perspective and it also draws on interdisciplinary knowledge from related fields of practice in health, education, business, and human services. The course emphasizes social justice and the effective and responsible use of human and material resources. Components of supervision and leadership such as administration, support, education, clinical supervision, performance management, recruitment and retention of employees, organizational context, interdisciplinary practice, and problem solving are addressed in this course. The course also encourages the development of styles of leadership and supervision that are respectful and anti-oppressive in nature.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Seminar

SOCW 651 - Legal Issues for Women
This course offers students an overview of constitutional, case and statutory law relating to current women's issues. With an emphasis on the application of Canadian law as it relates to issues facing social workers, the course examines the implications, to women, of recent changes in constitutional law (e.g. equality provisions in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms), marital and property laws (e.g. child custody and maintenance), and civil and criminal laws (e.g. issues of sexual harrassment, sexual assault, wife assault).
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

SOCW 670 - Aboriginal Peoples of Canada: Past/Present/Future
This course examines the history of Aboriginal peoples in Canada and current and future impacts on Aboriginal children and youth. A particular focus is on the importance and knowledge of traditional family systems, parental attachment, and evolving methods and practices. Discussions also include managing personal issues in professional practice, self-care and the intersection of Aboriginal and Western frameworks for physical and mental health.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: World Wide Web

SOCW 671 - Reflections on Practice: Child/Youth Mental Health
This course provides an opportunity to reflect on practice. The course surveys historical and cultural development of social work practice, emphasizing contemporary models such as anti-oppressive practice, constructivism, and feminist practice. The students study assessment, intervention, planning, advocacy, organizing, recording, confidentiality, evaluation, case management, interdisciplinary environments, and termination.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: World Wide Web

SOCW 672 - Social Work/Counselling Skills with Children/Youth
This course examines practice and intervention skills for working with Aboriginal children and youth. Topics discussed include: basic issues of child development; communication skills that are effective in working with younger people; and specific therapeutic assessments and interventions. The importance of balancing the relationship between western and traditional treatment and intervention approaches is also explored.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: World Wide Web

SOCW 673 - Mental Illness and Addictions among Children/Youth
This course focuses on common types of mental illness with an overview of substance misuse and addictions. Students are introduced to structural elements impacting mental health such as poverty, racism, and isolation, as well as biological, traumatic, attachment, and familial factors. The epidemiological and etiological related mental illness among Aboriginal children and youth are examined. Pharmacological interventions are also examined.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: World Wide Web

SOCW 674 - Crisis Work With Children/Youth: Restoring Balance
This course examines the nature and types of crisis situations faced by children and youth, with special attention to Aboriginal children and youth. Basic crisis intervention skills are identified and aimed at the restoration of balance. There is a particular focus on suicide, including assessment of suicide lethality, intervention skills, skills for working with survivors, cluster suicide and suicide epidemics, and prevention work. The course addresses other trauma or crisis work, critical incident debriefing with children and youth and individual, family and community risk and protective factors.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: World Wide Web

SOCW 675 - Community-Based Prevention: Creating Balance
This course examines community prevention strategies and risk reduction as it applies to child and youth mental health, and highlights the role and restoration of traditional activities that promote wellness for Aboriginal children and youth. Interventions and practical application of prevention strategies in relation to suicide, parenting, disability, and other issues are addressed. The course emphasizes approaches to identifying and building on existing community programs and community strengths.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: World Wide Web

SOCW 698 - Special Topics
This course number designation will be available to permit faculty to offer courses in areas of specialization.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Self-Directed, Audio/Video, World Wide Web

SOCW 700 - MSW Thesis
Students taking this route will register for a thesis leading to a written report of high academic quality that demonstrates mastery of the field specified and an ability to undertake research. The thesis may be based on research about models of advanced practice, policy and/or evaluation in the thematic areas of the MSW program.
Credits: 12.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Masters Thesis

SOCW 701 - Research Practicum
This course is a research-based practicum that provides students with the opportunity to enhance and refine their research skills. It normally takes place two days per week over one semester. This elective is available to both practicum and thesis route students.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Practicum

SOCW 703 - MSW Project
Students are asked to select and analyse in depth a case which can be drawn from previous employment or a practicum or as determined by the Social Work program. The efficacy of the case must be approved by the Supervisory Committee. The case materials can be drawn from practice, policy, administrations, or research. They may be clinical, policy-focused, or related to community development or social planning. The case analysis will be presented as a formal report. The case study analysis will be examined in two parts: as a written report and through an oral defence. The approval of the Supervisory Committee must be obtained prior to the oral defence. Depending on individual circumstances, a practicum may be required of some students.
Credits: 6.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Masters Project

SOCW 704 - MSW Integrative Seminar
MSW Integrative Seminar. MSW Thesis/Practicum/Project Proposal Development/Integrative Seminar has two dimensions. One is the focus on the relationship between theory, ideology, policy and practice in the study of social welfare. Its objective is to enable students to acquire, develop and apply analytical approaches to the social policy. The second dimension focuses on the development of thesis/practicum/project proposals. Students are encouraged to use theoretical approaches in the formulation of the MSW research for thesis, practicum and project. It examines the steps used in the development of thesis, practicum and project proposals. It gives the students an opportunity to present their proposals and thesis/practicum/project plans with other students and faculty.
Credits: 3.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Audio/Video, Seminar

SOCW 732 - MSW Practicum II
This field placement requires students to perform in a social work role or organizational setting. Field education provides students with an opportunity to enhance and refine their social work skills and focus on an area of particular interest. Students normally are placed in an agency or organizational setting that matches their specific learning needs.
Credits: 9.000

Levels: Graduate
Schedule Types: Practicum


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